Lone Pairs on Cenrtral Atom

(Polar molecules, Non-polar molecules, etc.)

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aphung1E
Posts: 80
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:15 am

Lone Pairs on Cenrtral Atom

Postby aphung1E » Sun Nov 24, 2019 8:02 pm

how do lone pairs around a central atom affect the bond angles in a molecule?

Harry Zhang 1B
Posts: 88
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Lone Pairs on Cenrtral Atom

Postby Harry Zhang 1B » Sun Nov 24, 2019 8:05 pm

The repulsive force between electrons is ranked as, lone-pair-lone-pair>lone-pair-electrons and electrons in a bond>electrons in a bond and electrons in the other bond. Therefore, lone pairs of electrons around the central atoms will be arranged in such a way they are furtherest from each other and therefore reducing the bond angle between two bonds to the central atom.

Jesalynne 2F
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Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Lone Pairs on Cenrtral Atom

Postby Jesalynne 2F » Sun Nov 24, 2019 8:21 pm

Since lone pairs repel the other bonds around the central atom the bond angle between bonds will decrease since they arrange themselves to be away from the lone pair(s).

Sreyes_1C
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:19 am

Re: Lone Pairs on Cenrtral Atom

Postby Sreyes_1C » Sun Nov 24, 2019 8:40 pm

the lone pairs will not attract the other bonds and actually repel them so bond angle decreases

Ashley Wang 4G
Posts: 83
Joined: Wed Sep 11, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Lone Pairs on Cenrtral Atom

Postby Ashley Wang 4G » Sun Nov 24, 2019 10:31 pm

Because lone pairs repel other lone pairs and bonded electron pairs more strongly than bonded electron pairs repel one another, the repulsion makes the bond angles smaller than they would be if the places the lone pairs occupy were taken up by bonded atoms instead.

SMIYAZAKI_1B
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Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Lone Pairs on Cenrtral Atom

Postby SMIYAZAKI_1B » Sun Nov 24, 2019 11:14 pm

Lone pairs on the central atom has higher electron repulsion energy present in comparison to the bonds. Therefore, you will see the bonds being pushed downwards and closer to each other because repulsión created by lone pairs will cause the bond angles to decrease.

Jesse Anderson-Ramirez 3I
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Joined: Thu Sep 26, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Lone Pairs on Cenrtral Atom

Postby Jesse Anderson-Ramirez 3I » Sun Nov 24, 2019 11:21 pm

Lone pairs repel other bonds and therefore cause the bond angles to decrease.

pJimenez3F
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Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Lone Pairs on Cenrtral Atom

Postby pJimenez3F » Sun Nov 24, 2019 11:26 pm

they push the attached bonds away

PGao_1B
Posts: 50
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Lone Pairs on Cenrtral Atom

Postby PGao_1B » Sun Nov 24, 2019 11:39 pm

Lone pairs around a central atom affect the bond angles in a molecule by decreasing them due to the repulsion between electrons.

Snigdha Uppu 1G
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Joined: Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Lone Pairs on Cenrtral Atom

Postby Snigdha Uppu 1G » Sun Nov 24, 2019 11:59 pm

Lone pairs have the highest repulsion, so even if the attached atoms are closer together when there is a lone pair, the molecule is more stable.

Caitlin Ciardelli 3E
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Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:19 am

Re: Lone Pairs on Cenrtral Atom

Postby Caitlin Ciardelli 3E » Mon Nov 25, 2019 12:06 am

Lone pairs on the central atom cause repulsion! This results in the surrounding atoms to be pushed closer together in efforts of getting as far away from these lone pairs as possible. It is more stable for bonds to be closer together than to the lone pair since lone pairs have a higher repulsion. For example, three atoms with no charge or any lone pairs will have a bond angle of 180 degrees. If you add a lone pair to the central atom, the other two atoms will be pushed closer together with a bond angle less than 180. Hope this helps :)

htatshwe_3L
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Joined: Tue Oct 02, 2018 12:16 am

Re: Lone Pairs on Cenrtral Atom

Postby htatshwe_3L » Mon Nov 25, 2019 12:08 am

They decrease the bond angles between atoms as they have the highest repulsion.


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