Hydrogen Bonding

(Polar molecules, Non-polar molecules, etc.)

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Kennedi2J
Posts: 101
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:20 am

Hydrogen Bonding

Postby Kennedi2J » Sun Nov 24, 2019 8:44 pm

If hydrogen bonding is present does that always mean the molecule is polar?

Philip
Posts: 100
Joined: Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Hydrogen Bonding

Postby Philip » Sun Nov 24, 2019 8:48 pm

It happens with polar molecules with N, O, F, elements that have lone pairs that attract Hydrogen

Kevin Liu 1J
Posts: 53
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Hydrogen Bonding

Postby Kevin Liu 1J » Sun Nov 24, 2019 9:34 pm

Since hydrogen bonding requries partial positive/negative bonding between Hydrogen (partial positive) and N, O, F (partial negative, it is usually polar.

gferg21
Posts: 51
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Hydrogen Bonding

Postby gferg21 » Sun Nov 24, 2019 9:35 pm

Hydrogen is always positive in an atom, so the electrons are going to be pulled away from it in a compound to make them more positive. This means that there will be polarity because the atom it is bonding to will be the one receiving the electron from hydrogen.

305376058
Posts: 35
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Hydrogen Bonding

Postby 305376058 » Sun Nov 24, 2019 10:32 pm

Typically, yes, because the hydrogen is attracted to atoms N, O, and F, that have stronger partial negative charges.

kpang_4H
Posts: 55
Joined: Fri Sep 20, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Hydrogen Bonding

Postby kpang_4H » Sun Nov 24, 2019 10:34 pm

305376058 wrote:Typically, yes, because the hydrogen is attracted to atoms N, O, and F, that have stronger partial negative charges.

I would also add that the N O F atoms must have a lone pair for hydrogen to bond.

Simon Dionson 4I
Posts: 107
Joined: Sat Sep 14, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Hydrogen Bonding

Postby Simon Dionson 4I » Sun Nov 24, 2019 10:44 pm

Yes, but the atom would have to have a partially positive on the hydrogen and there would have to be a strongly electronegative atom, like N, O, or F

SMIYAZAKI_1B
Posts: 63
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Hydrogen Bonding

Postby SMIYAZAKI_1B » Sun Nov 24, 2019 11:12 pm

Commonly, hydrogen bonding is polar due to its nature of bonding only with N,O, and F. Since hydrogen isn’t high on electronegativity, the difference will always be larger towards the other element.

Jacob Villar 2C
Posts: 105
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Hydrogen Bonding

Postby Jacob Villar 2C » Sun Nov 24, 2019 11:30 pm

Yes, since hydrogen bonds form with the elements N, O, and F, and these are more electronegative atoms.

kendal mccarthy
Posts: 109
Joined: Wed Nov 14, 2018 12:22 am

Re: Hydrogen Bonding

Postby kendal mccarthy » Sun Nov 24, 2019 11:40 pm

Yes, because in the ranking of powers of IMF's hydrogen bonding is a specialized kind of dipole-dipole bonding which is actually stronger, so if a molesule has H bonding it will be polar.

Matthew Tsai 2H
Posts: 101
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:20 am

Re: Hydrogen Bonding

Postby Matthew Tsai 2H » Sun Nov 24, 2019 11:41 pm

Yes, generally with the conditions necessary for hydrogen bonding to occur, which is hydrogen bonded to a very electronegative atom (F, O, or N), the resulting molecule would be polar.

Alfred Barrion 2H
Posts: 100
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Hydrogen Bonding

Postby Alfred Barrion 2H » Sun Nov 24, 2019 11:42 pm

Yes, hydrogen bonding should have a partial positive or negative charge.

Caitlin Ciardelli 3E
Posts: 44
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:19 am

Re: Hydrogen Bonding

Postby Caitlin Ciardelli 3E » Mon Nov 25, 2019 12:02 am

Yes. This is because Hydrogen's partial positive charge is attracted to a partial negatively charged atom (Nitrogen, oxygen, or fluorine) to create a hydrogen bond. This is why the resulting molecule is polar! Hope this helps :)

Laura WM 3I
Posts: 31
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:19 am

Re: Hydrogen Bonding

Postby Laura WM 3I » Mon Nov 25, 2019 12:03 am

Isn't it possible for hydrogen bonding to occur in a symmetrical formation that would cause dipole moments to cancel and the whole molecule to be non polar?


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