T-Shape Polarity

(Polar molecules, Non-polar molecules, etc.)

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Joey_Okumura_1E
Posts: 119
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:58 pm

T-Shape Polarity

Postby Joey_Okumura_1E » Sun Nov 29, 2020 11:41 am

Is every molecule that is arranged in a T-shape polar?

Gina Spagarino 3G
Posts: 95
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:48 pm
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: T-Shape Polarity

Postby Gina Spagarino 3G » Sun Nov 29, 2020 11:51 am

T shape will always mean polar... of the different trigonal bipyramidal orbital arrangements with the sp3d hybridization, only the trigonal bipyramidal with 5 attached atoms or the linear model with 2 bonded atoms and 3 lone pairs can be nonpolar given that their bonded atoms are the same.

Ashley Ko 3I
Posts: 106
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:54 pm

Re: T-Shape Polarity

Postby Ashley Ko 3I » Sun Nov 29, 2020 12:20 pm

Hi! I agree with the above post that every molecule that has a T-shape will be polar. Out of the four molecular shapes with 5 electron domains/density regions, two will always be polar: T-shape and see-saw. This is because the lone pairs of each cause an asymmetrical arrangement (dipole moments won’t cancel out). I hope this helps!

Keon Amirazodi 3H
Posts: 95
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:59 pm

Re: T-Shape Polarity

Postby Keon Amirazodi 3H » Sun Nov 29, 2020 1:53 pm

Yes, it will. The dipoles will never cancel out so there will always be an unequal sharing of electrons.

IshanModiDis2L
Posts: 95
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:49 pm

Re: T-Shape Polarity

Postby IshanModiDis2L » Sun Nov 29, 2020 4:18 pm

Yes, like the posts above mentioned, the dipoles wont ever cancel out so there will always be an unequal sharing of electrons as the lone pairs cause an asymmetrical shape where the dipoles still exist.


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