Octet Rule

(Polar molecules, Non-polar molecules, etc.)

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dbalestra4F
Posts: 19
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Octet Rule

Postby dbalestra4F » Fri Nov 06, 2015 5:15 pm

Is there a maximum number of atoms (and/or electrons) that can be around the central atom if the central atom doesn't obey the octet rule? Is it 6 atoms and 12 electrons?

Kim Vu 2G
Posts: 29
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Octet Rule

Postby Kim Vu 2G » Fri Nov 06, 2015 10:32 pm

If it does not obey the octet rule, it can have more than 8 electrons on the central atom depending on the element because some transition metals can have up to 18 electrons because of the extra shells that can be filled in the d block so it just really depends on the atom itself.

Vanessa A 3F
Posts: 29
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Octet Rule

Postby Vanessa A 3F » Sun Nov 29, 2015 8:50 pm

In our class I think we won't deal with the extremely complicated cases and instead mainly focus on the atoms in the second period of the periodic table instead, and as long as the formal charge agrees with the Lewis structure you come with, that's fine. For example, SF6 and PF5 should intuitively make sense because expanding the octet makes the central atom's charge 0; and that's what we're looking for.

704624208
Posts: 14
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Octet Rule

Postby 704624208 » Sun Nov 29, 2015 9:20 pm

Remember also that not obeying the octet rule does not have to go beyond "8" electrons. Elements like Hydrogen are content with 2 electrons, Lithium with 2, Beryllium with 4, Boron with 6, and so on. The "Octet Rule" really is intending to only apply to four VERY IMPORTANT elements; Carbon, Nitrogen, Oxygen, and Fluorine.


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