Hybridization in Double and Triple bonds


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Akshay Anand
Posts: 20
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am

Hybridization in Double and Triple bonds

Postby Akshay Anand » Sat Nov 25, 2017 11:25 am

How does hybridization work with atoms that contain double and triple bonds. Why would a carbon with a triple bond on one atom and a single bond on another have a hybridization of sp?

Nisarg Shah 1C
Posts: 54
Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:00 am

Re: Hybridization in Double and Triple bonds

Postby Nisarg Shah 1C » Sat Nov 25, 2017 1:00 pm

Hybridization is based on the regions of electron density around the central atom. Because a triple bond and a single bond would mean that the carbon is bound to 2 atoms, it has sp hybridization because of the two regions. It would have 2 electrons in the sp orbital for 2 sigma bonds, and 2 unpaired electrons in the p-orbital for the two pi bonds.

Katherine Jordak 1H
Posts: 51
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:05 am

Re: Hybridization in Double and Triple bonds

Postby Katherine Jordak 1H » Mon Nov 27, 2017 9:12 am

Just to clarify some more, region of electron density are where a single/double/triple bond is or where a lone pair is. When deciding the hybridization of an atom, there should be one orbital (an s or a p or a d) for each region of electron density. An atom with a triple bond and one lone pair has two regions of electron density. Therefore, its hybridization would be sp (one orbital per region of electron density). An atom that is bonded to three other atoms and has no lone pairs would be spp, or sp^2. One orbital for each region of electron density present on the atom.


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