Hybridization purpose


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Moris 1H
Posts: 33
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:01 am

Hybridization purpose

Postby Moris 1H » Sun May 27, 2018 6:48 pm

If the way we write an electron configuration for an atom has to be modified to draw the bonds we make, why don't we just use the hybridization electron configuration as the only model? Isn't having two inaccurate?

Sophia Diaz - Dis 1B
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Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:02 am
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Re: Hybridization purpose

Postby Sophia Diaz - Dis 1B » Sun May 27, 2018 9:32 pm

I think it has something to do with the fact that hybridization does not always happen. So in the case of carbon, hybridization only happens because that what the shape and bonds require. But not every ground state element will have hybridization because it doesn't need Hybridization. For example, Hydrogen cannot hybridize because it only has s orbitals, and elements like oxygen won't hybridize when bonded to one atom but it will with 2 atoms since that what the shape would require.

The best way to get if something needs to be hybridized is by counting unpaired electrons and then counting the number of bonds it can make. Hybridization is also fairly rare as long as I know, so I don't think we need to worry about it too much.

Sophia Diaz - Dis 1B
Posts: 73
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:02 am
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Re: Hybridization purpose

Postby Sophia Diaz - Dis 1B » Wed May 30, 2018 3:16 pm

From what we learned in lexture today it looks like I was only partially correct. Hybridizations happens a lot more often then I thought, but it still only happens based on regions of density and shape. So you would use shape and density to determine when something hybridizes.

To answer the question about why we dont write electron configurations with hybrid orbitals, its because hybridization only happens when atoms are bonding. Lone atoms will not have hybrid orbitals because they are not sharing electrons or bonding with any other atom.

Cindy Nguyen 1L
Posts: 48
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:04 am

Re: Hybridization purpose

Postby Cindy Nguyen 1L » Wed May 30, 2018 11:13 pm

I agree. The atoms wouldn't need to have hybridized orbitals when it's not bonding. When the orbitals are hybridized, the electron(s) is/are moved to a higher energy orbital. For example, carbon alone is at a 2s22p2. That is a lower energy state than if it had 1 unpaired electron in its s orbital and then 3 more unpaired electrons in its p orbital. It is only because the overall energy after bonding is lower that the electrons would move to higher energy orbital. So after the orbitals are hybridized, there are four unpaired electrons, which is where the 4 hydrogens (if making methane) would bond.


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