Hybridization and it's relation to valence electrons


Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

Kaleb Tesfaye 1I
Posts: 29
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:05 am
Been upvoted: 1 time

Hybridization and it's relation to valence electrons

Postby Kaleb Tesfaye 1I » Thu May 31, 2018 9:12 am

If a carbon atom is bonded to another atom/s with only single bonds, will it always have a hypridization of 2sp3? Since regions of e- density is equal to the number of hybrid orbital, as long as carbon is not bonded with a double or triple bond, it will always have 4 hybrid orbitals right?

jessicasam
Posts: 36
Joined: Wed Nov 15, 2017 3:02 am
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Hybridization and it's relation to valence electrons

Postby jessicasam » Thu May 31, 2018 9:20 am

Yes. Carbon typical forms 4 singles bonds. Each of these single bonds will have a hypridization of 2sp3. This is because we need a better way to explain how carbon can form 4 bonds if we usually see the valence electrons written as 2s2 2p2.

Emma Leshan 1B
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:03 am

Re: Hybridization and it's relation to valence electrons

Postby Emma Leshan 1B » Sun Jun 03, 2018 12:40 pm

So if there's a double bond, and 2 single bonds on carbon, the hybridization would be sp2? How does that work in respect to valence electrons?

Jennifer Tuell 1B
Posts: 34
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:05 am

Re: Hybridization and it's relation to valence electrons

Postby Jennifer Tuell 1B » Sun Jun 03, 2018 1:07 pm

Each C will have three regions of electron density and will need three hybrid orbitals. Trigonal Planar makes each C sp2 hybridized. There will be 3 electrons in the 2sp2 region and 1 unpaired electron in 2p which is higher in energy than the hybridized region. The unhybridized 2p orbital on each C overlap side by side to form a pi bond. the double bond is one sigma and one pi bond.


Return to “Hybridization”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest