Regions of Electron Desnity


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Phoebe Chen 4I
Posts: 55
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:29 am

Regions of Electron Desnity

Postby Phoebe Chen 4I » Tue Nov 27, 2018 5:11 pm

Do lone pairs count as regions of electron density for hybridization?

MaanasO 1A
Posts: 72
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:26 am

Re: Regions of Electron Desnity

Postby MaanasO 1A » Tue Nov 27, 2018 5:15 pm

Yes! When determining hybridization, you have to count the number of lone pairs and sigma bonds around the atom of interest.

Dana Wilks 3I
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am

Re: Regions of Electron Desnity

Postby Dana Wilks 3I » Tue Nov 27, 2018 5:20 pm

Yes, and they also count when determine electron arrangement. It is important however, to remember that lone pairs do not count when naming the shape.

Alli Hinmon 3E
Posts: 30
Joined: Wed Nov 08, 2017 3:00 am

Re: Regions of Electron Desnity

Postby Alli Hinmon 3E » Sat Dec 01, 2018 7:12 pm

One thing I got confused on with this is when there is just one lone electron, lets say there is 41 electrons total and every element has an octet, you don't count the lone electron as a region of electron density, I believe you just ignore it, unless I am mistaken.

SydBenedict2H
Posts: 60
Joined: Wed Nov 08, 2017 3:00 am

Re: Regions of Electron Desnity

Postby SydBenedict2H » Sat Dec 01, 2018 8:03 pm

So for hybridization we count all bonding pairs and all lone pairs to get all the regions of electron density? Do we ever only count the bonding pairs?

SydBenedict2H
Posts: 60
Joined: Wed Nov 08, 2017 3:00 am

Re: Regions of Electron Desnity

Postby SydBenedict2H » Sat Dec 01, 2018 8:05 pm

Also, regarding this,
Dana Wilks 3I wrote:Yes, and they also count when determine electron arrangement. It is important however, to remember that lone pairs do not count when naming the shape.
The lone pairs DO count when naming the shape in some instances as it can help you know what shape it is. If its just 3 bonds and no lone pairs its going to be trigonal planar, but if its 3 bonds and 2 lone pairs then its T-Shaped. The bonding pairs make up the backbone of the structure, but lone pairs definitely influence the shape as they heavily repel bonded pairs. Seesaw has 4 bonded pairs and 1 lone pair, if it didn't have a lone pair it would likely just be tetrahedral.


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