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lone pairs

Posted: Sat Dec 01, 2018 8:33 pm
by Moryel Yashar 1J
Are lone pairs taken into consideration when determining the hybridization of a central atom?

Re: lone pairs

Posted: Sat Dec 01, 2018 8:52 pm
by Nicholas Carpo 1L
Yes the lone pairs are taken into account since the number of hybrid orbitals is equal to the number of regions of e- density around the atom.

Re: lone pairs

Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2018 12:04 am
by Yvonne Du
Yes, one lone pair is considered as one electron density. Since hybridization is based on the number of electron density, you consider lone pairs too.

Re: lone pairs

Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2018 12:12 am
by Kavya Juwadi 3C
One example of this would be the the molecule H^2O. The central atom, oxygen has two bonds ( one with each hydrogen ) and two sets of lones pairs. Therefore the hybridization of oxygen would sp^3.

Re: lone pairs

Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2018 12:56 am
by Tony Ong 3K
yes lone pairs dictates the molecular shape.
For instance, let us assume that a central atom has a steric number of 4. This means that its electron arrangement is tetrahedral, however say it has 2 lone pairs. This means that the molecular shape is angular.

Anyhow, Have a nice night!!!

Re: lone pairs

Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2018 9:40 am
by Samantha Chang 2K
Yes, a lone pair is considered a region of electron density and therefore you will count it to find hybridization.

Re: lone pairs

Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2018 11:39 am
by Eruchi Okpara 2E
Is the answer automatically wrong if lone pairs are not separated from the shared pairs of electrons? for instance, if something has 3 shared pairs of electrons and 2 lone pairs, can it only be written as AX3E2 or can you write it as AX5?

Re: lone pairs

Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2018 1:59 pm
by SophiaKohlhoff4B
Eruchi Okpara 4D wrote:Is the answer automatically wrong if lone pairs are not separated from the shared pairs of electrons? for instance, if something has 3 shared pairs of electrons and 2 lone pairs, can it only be written as AX3E2 or can you write it as AX5?


The VSEPR formula calls to use A for the central atom, X for the bonded atoms, and E for the lone pairs of electrons. You can't write AX3E2 as AX5 because the shape of the molecules will be different.

Re: lone pairs

Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2018 4:30 pm
by Abhi4F
Yes, since lone pairs are a region of electron density it is taken into account for hybridization.

Re: lone pairs

Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2018 4:31 pm
by Daniel Lai
Lone pairs count as an area of electron density so they count for hybridization.

Re: lone pairs

Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2018 4:40 pm
by leediane0916
the lone pair counts as one electron density so you have to consider it!

Re: lone pairs

Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2018 8:09 pm
by 305127455
Long pairs does count, and memorizing this and "formula" of hybridization should be enough to solve most of the related problems.

Re: lone pairs

Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2018 8:24 pm
by 905109118
Yes the lone pairs are taken into consideration. The number of hybrid orbitals is equal to the number of regions around the atom.

Re: lone pairs

Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2018 8:53 pm
by Divya Pimparkar 1E
Yes, lone pairs are taken into account for hybridization because they are an electron region so they're used for placing electrons in hybrid orbitals

Re: lone pairs

Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2018 9:23 pm
by Anand Narayan 1G
Yes, Lone pairs do indeed count as an area of electron density, so yes, they count for hybridization.

Re: lone pairs

Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2018 11:10 pm
by Anjali 4A
To figure out hybridization, we need to calculate the steric number which is the number of sigma bonds and number of lone pairs, therefore do have to take lone pairs into account when figuring out the hybridization.

Re: lone pairs

Posted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 10:54 am
by Ricardo Martin 1J
Yes, since hybridization relates to the # of areas of electron density and lone pairs are considered an area of electron density, then lone pairs are taken into consideration for hybridization.

Re: lone pairs

Posted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 11:01 am
by Jaifreen_Bhangu_3K
Yes, you consider all regions of electron density.

Re: lone pairs

Posted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 3:55 pm
by Jchellis 1I
Lone pairs count just as much as an atom for a region of electron density

Re: lone pairs

Posted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 4:30 pm
by josephperez_2C
Each lone pair is considered a region of electron density so they should be taken into account.

Re: lone pairs

Posted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 5:55 pm
by Jack Hewitt 2H
Moryel Yashar 1J wrote:Are lone pairs taken into consideration when determining the hybridization of a central atom?

Yes lone pairs are taken into consideration because they are still areas of electron density.