Page 1 of 1

hybridization

Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2018 7:17 pm
by KarlaArevalo2F
Does anyone have an easy way to find the hybridization of the central atom they are able to share? Much appreciated.

Re: hybridization

Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2018 7:21 pm
by chris_tsai_4H
Count the number of electron densities that are surrounding the central atom. For example, if there are 4, then the hybridization is sp3. If there are 5, then it is sp3d, since the p orbital can only contain three, and s can only have one, the 5th electron goes to the d orbital.

Re: hybridization

Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2018 7:22 pm
by Blake Salfer 1B
I usually look at how many other atoms are being attached to the central atom and if it is say 3 other atoms the hybridization is just one less; sp2. For 5 and 6atoms attached to the central atom you just have to remember you are using d orbitals so it will always have an sp3 and then however many d orbitals are being used. If it is 5 it will be dsp3 and 6 is d2sp3

Re: hybridization

Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2018 9:51 pm
by 305117729
the number of hybridized orbitals is the same as the number of electron densities. e.g. a tetrahedral molecule has four electron densities, so it's sp3 hybridized.

Re: hybridization

Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2018 10:01 pm
by Matthew Choi 2H
Like other people said before, count the number of areas of electron density. Lone pairs count as one area of electron density. Single, double, and triple bonds also only count as one are of electron density. It might be weird to think that a double and triple bond count only as a single area of electron density since they have four and six electrons involved, respectively, but I guess it kind of makes sense since they attach only 2 atoms together. Once you have the number of areas of electron density, then you should have a corresponding number of orbitals in the hybridized orbital. E.g. 1 area of electron density = s, 2 areas = sp, 3 areas = sp2, 4 areas = sp3, 5 areas = sp3d, 6 areas = sp3d2

Re: hybridization

Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2018 10:19 pm
by 405021651
count the number of electron densities then use "spppdd" and add one letter for each density. Ex. 1 region=s , 4 regions=sp^3, 5 regions=sp^3d

Re: hybridization

Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2018 10:22 pm
by Sheridan Slaterbeck 1J
I think you have to draw out the Lewis structure for sure, then count electron densities and find subsequent and matching spd number
s=1
sp=2
sp2 =3
sp3 =4
sp3d =5 etc

Re: hybridization

Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2018 10:41 pm
by NatBrown1I
One less than the electron groups that surround it (lone and bonding pairs)

2 = sp
3 = sp2
4 = sp3
5 = sp3d
6 = sp3d2

Re: hybridization

Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2018 11:03 pm
by Akhil Paladugu 3G
You have to first draw out the lewis structure, then count the electron densities and then the matching spd number. For 1 electron density it is s, 2=sp, 3=sp^2, etc.

Re: hybridization

Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2018 11:05 pm
by Anjali 4A
Draw the lewis structure, and calculate the steric number which is the number of sigma bonds and number of lone pairs. Based on the steric number we can figure out the hybridization. E.g. steric number 2 = sp, 3= sp2 and so on.

Re: hybridization

Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2018 11:13 pm
by Kelsey Li 3B
You should draw the Lewis structure first then count the electron densities. What I also do is I look at the shape that the central atom is a part of and determine its hybridization from it.

Re: hybridization

Posted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 6:02 pm
by Jack Hewitt 2H
KarlaArevalo4D wrote:Does anyone have an easy way to find the hybridization of the central atom they are able to share? Much appreciated.

The easiest way is to consider the number of regions with electron density. This includes lone pairs.

Re: hybridization

Posted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 6:03 pm
by Kunseo Yook 2E
Draw the lewis structure and count the number of electron densities around the atom you are looking at.

Re: hybridization

Posted: Sun Dec 09, 2018 11:35 pm
by 405021651
I would just count the number of electron densities