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hybridizing oxygen

Posted: Wed Nov 20, 2019 12:50 am
by kevinchang_4I
In question 2.45, there is an O with a double bond with C and 2 lone pairs. How do I hybridize the O?

Re: hybridizing oxygen

Posted: Wed Nov 20, 2019 9:52 am
by Michael Nguyen 1E
Since the oxygen has one double bond and two lone pairs, there are a total of three regions of electron density around it. Three regions of electron density correspond with an sp2 hybridization for the oxygen.

Re: hybridizing oxygen

Posted: Wed Nov 20, 2019 12:26 pm
by Kurtis Liang 3I
To find the hybridization of an atom, you need to find its steric number. The steric number is calculated by adding the number of atoms bonded to the central atom plus the number of lone pairs on the central atom. In this case, because oxygen has 1 carbon bonded to it + 2 lone pairs, its steric number is 3, giving it a sp2 hybridization.

Note: Double and triple bonds don't matter when determining hybridization, they all count as one.

Re: hybridizing oxygen

Posted: Fri Nov 22, 2019 11:57 am
by nicole-2B
Kurtis Liang 3I wrote:To find the hybridization of an atom, you need to find its steric number. The steric number is calculated by adding the number of atoms bonded to the central atom plus the number of lone pairs on the central atom. In this case, because oxygen has 1 carbon bonded to it + 2 lone pairs, its steric number is 3, giving it a sp2 hybridization.

Note: Double and triple bonds don't matter when determining hybridization, they all count as one.

Thank you for making this clear!!

Re: hybridizing oxygen

Posted: Fri Nov 22, 2019 12:09 pm
by Suraj Doshi 2G
The oxygen has three regions of electron density thus we can determine that it will have a hybridization of sp^2.

Re: hybridizing oxygen

Posted: Fri Nov 22, 2019 3:54 pm
by Junxi Feng 3B
Since the oxygen has two lone pairs and a double with another atom, it has a total of three bonding regions, and therefore it has a hybridization of sp2.