Page 1 of 1

Hybridization with lone pairs on central atom

Posted: Thu Nov 21, 2019 1:37 pm
by Isabel Day 1D
Can hybridization be done for atoms with shapes that aren't linear, trigonal planar, tetrahedral, trigonal bipyramidal, or octahedral? For example, can atoms with bent, seesaw, etc. shapes have a hybridization? If not, why?

Re: Hybridization with lone pairs on central atom

Posted: Thu Nov 21, 2019 2:30 pm
by Ziyan Wang 3J
Yes, it's basically the same rule as the one without lone pairs. 2 electron domains -> sp, 3 -> sp2, 4 -> sp3, 5 -> sp3d, 6 -> sp3d2

Re: Hybridization with lone pairs on central atom

Posted: Thu Nov 21, 2019 6:38 pm
by karinaseth_1A
Atoms with lone pairs can be hybridized, such as the example NH3 that Dr. Lavelle gave in class. This is because the final hybridization state must reflect the number of electron density regions around the central atom, which includes any lone pairs. Going back to the NH3 example, the two lone pairs on the N are reflected in the hybridization state sp3, but there is a full suborbital with a pair of electrons.

Re: Hybridization with lone pairs on central atom

Posted: Fri Nov 22, 2019 7:32 pm
by Ruth Glauber 1C
Yes, and I think page 119 had an example on this?

Re: Hybridization with lone pairs on central atom

Posted: Sat Nov 23, 2019 4:15 pm
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Yes since the regions of electron density correlates with the hybridization. 2 regions=sp and so on like without lone pairs.

Re: Hybridization with lone pairs on central atom

Posted: Sat Nov 23, 2019 4:21 pm
by John Arambulo 1I
Hybridization is based on the number of regions of electron density.

Re: Hybridization with lone pairs on central atom

Posted: Sat Nov 23, 2019 4:32 pm
by Alan Wu
Yes, this can happen. The number of electron density regions equals the number of hybrid orbitals created. However, the lone pairs would be already-paired electrons in these hybrid orbitals. The unpaired electrons, on the other hand, are responsible for forming bonds with the orbitals of other atoms.