unhybridized orbitals?


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Giovanni Anguiano-Gutierrez 3L
Posts: 52
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:17 am

unhybridized orbitals?

Postby Giovanni Anguiano-Gutierrez 3L » Tue Dec 03, 2019 3:22 pm

I am not quite sure how you would obtain an unhybridized orbital for hybridization. Take ethene for example, C is its central atom and its hybridization is sp^2 because of the three electron densities, but when writing it out where does the 2p orbital with an electron come from?

Ryan Yee 1J
Posts: 56
Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:16 am

Re: unhybridized orbitals?

Postby Ryan Yee 1J » Tue Dec 03, 2019 7:52 pm

In ethene, the carbon has to hybridize its p and s orbitals, so it can create four bonds. My guess is that in order to hybridize, Carbon requires some energy and so it would only create as many hybridized orbitals as it needs. Since, in ethene, it only needs 3 electrons to form sigma bonds, carbon only hybridizes three so that the other one doesn't have to use energy and undergo hybridization.

https://www.chemguide.co.uk/basicorg/bo ... thene.html

Jasmine 2C
Posts: 107
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:18 am

Re: unhybridized orbitals?

Postby Jasmine 2C » Wed Dec 04, 2019 12:28 am

Giovanni Anguiano-Gutierrez 3L wrote:I am not quite sure how you would obtain an unhybridized orbital for hybridization. Take ethene for example, C is its central atom and its hybridization is sp^2 because of the three electron densities, but when writing it out where does the 2p orbital with an electron come from?

I am very confused about this topic too. How do we know when there are unhybridized orbitals?


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