Sapling #12


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Lea Chamoun 2J
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Sapling #12

Postby Lea Chamoun 2J » Thu Nov 26, 2020 3:40 pm

An organic compound that is distilled from wood has a molar mass of 32.04g/mol. Its composition by mass is 37.5% carbon, 12.6% hydrogen, and 49.9% oxygen.
I was able to find the molecule, CH4O, and the Lewis structure, but the next part of the question asks for the hybridization of the oxygen atom. Could someone help me find the hybridized orbital?

Andrew Wang 1C
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Re: Sapling #12

Postby Andrew Wang 1C » Thu Nov 26, 2020 3:44 pm

Finding the hybridization of the oxygen is similar to finding the hybridization of the carbon. You'd look at how many regions of electron density the oxygen atom has (# of bonds + lone pairs), and use that to find the hybridization.

Hope this helps!

BrittneyMyint1D
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Re: Sapling #12

Postby BrittneyMyint1D » Thu Nov 26, 2020 8:20 pm

Hello, as the person above said, the hybridization of the atoms depend on the region of electron density. From the Lewis structure, you see that both C and O have four regions of electron density, so the hybridization for the oxygen and carbon is sp3 hybridization. Hope this helps!

Josh Chou 3K
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Re: Sapling #12

Postby Josh Chou 3K » Thu Nov 26, 2020 9:04 pm

You can find the hybridization of the oxygen by looking at how many regions of electron density it has. Because it has two bonds and two lone pairs, the oxygen has 4 regions of electron density, giving it a sp3 hybridization

kristinalaudis3e
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Re: Sapling #12

Postby kristinalaudis3e » Fri Nov 27, 2020 12:54 pm

The hybridization of atoms depends on the number of regions of electron density. both C and O have 4 regions, therefore it has a sp3 hybridization.

Katie Lam 2J
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Re: Sapling #12

Postby Katie Lam 2J » Sat Nov 28, 2020 12:00 pm

Because C has 4 regions of electron density (4 single bonds), and O also has 4 regions of electron density (2 single bonds and 2 lone pairs), the hybridization of both C and O is sp3.

Chloe Shamtob 2H
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Re: Sapling #12

Postby Chloe Shamtob 2H » Sat Nov 28, 2020 12:31 pm

To find the hybridization of the oxygen atom you must first consider the region of electron densities on the atom. By looking at the oxygen atom, you can see it that it has two bonds and two lone pairs giving it four regions of electron density. Therefore, you can conclude that the oxygen atom has a hybridization of sp3

Shivani Kapur 2J
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Re: Sapling #12

Postby Shivani Kapur 2J » Sat Nov 28, 2020 1:54 pm

The hybridization is the electron density around the atom. Double and triple bonds also just count as a single region of electron density.

Justin Lin 1B
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Re: Sapling #12

Postby Justin Lin 1B » Sat Nov 28, 2020 2:13 pm

To find the hybridization of the oxygen atom in CH4O, we just have to look at how many regions of electron density are present on the oxygen atom like the bonds connected to it and lone pairs

VincentLe_3A
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Re: Sapling #12

Postby VincentLe_3A » Sat Nov 28, 2020 2:19 pm

Finding hybridization involves counting the number of regions of electron density around the atom. In the carbon, it has 4 single bonds, 3 to each hydrogen and 1 to the oxygen. This results in a sp3 hybridization as there are 4 regions of electron density. Oxygen has two lone pairs of electrons, a bond to carbon, and a bond to hydrogen, making up 4 regions of electron density and thus, sp3 hybridization.

Malakai Espinosa 3E
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Re: Sapling #12

Postby Malakai Espinosa 3E » Sat Nov 28, 2020 2:27 pm

To find the hybridization of a given atom, simply look at the regions of electron density around the atom! This includes bond pairs and lone pairs. This will allow you to figure out the hybridization.

Nhu Pham-Dis3G
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Re: Sapling #12

Postby Nhu Pham-Dis3G » Sat Nov 28, 2020 6:40 pm

Hi! If you still need help with this question, the first step I did was count up all the regions of electron density and then used the hybridization guidelines to determine the answer.

Colin Squire 3B
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Re: Sapling #12

Postby Colin Squire 3B » Sat Nov 28, 2020 6:46 pm

In order to find the hybridized orbitals of the oxygen, you should first look to see how many electron domains it has. Since there are two bonding pairs and two lone pairs, there are 4 domains of electron density, which refers to sp3.

Reese_Gover2K
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Re: Sapling #12

Postby Reese_Gover2K » Sun Nov 29, 2020 11:56 am

So finding the hybridization of the oxygen is, like everyone else is saying, the same idea as finding the hybridization of the carbon. So look at your structure and count all the regions of electron density that Oxygen has, and then pick the hybridization that matches that number of regions. Hope this helps :)

Talia Dini - 3I
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Re: Sapling #12

Postby Talia Dini - 3I » Sun Nov 29, 2020 1:12 pm

Hi! The hybridization of the carbon and oxygen atoms depends on how many regions of electron density it has. The carbon atom has 4 regions of electron density because it has 4 single bonds. The oxygen atom has 4 regions of electron density because it has 2 single bonds and 2 lone pairs. Thus, the hybridization of both the carbon and oxygen atoms would be sp3.

RitaThomas_3G
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Re: Sapling #12

Postby RitaThomas_3G » Sun Nov 29, 2020 3:17 pm

Since you have found the lewis structure already, look at how many bonds/lone pairs the oxygen atom has. We can see that it has 4 bonds, which means that it has a hybridization of sp^3.

Halle Villalobos 3E
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Re: Sapling #12

Postby Halle Villalobos 3E » Sun Nov 29, 2020 5:11 pm

Hi! The carbon atom has single bonds to four other atoms via four equivalent sp^3-hybridized orbitals. The oxygen atom has single bonds to two other atoms and two lone pairs of electrons. Therefore, oxygen is also sp^3-hybridized. I hope this helps!

Isabella Cortes 2H
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Re: Sapling #12

Postby Isabella Cortes 2H » Sun Nov 29, 2020 5:18 pm

to find the hybrized orbital you would count up all the regions of electron density that the oxygen has and use that to determine its hybridization. Since oxygen has 2 lone pairs and 2 bonds, it has 4 regions of electron density so its hybridization is sp^3

FionaHunter21
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Re: Sapling #12

Postby FionaHunter21 » Sun Nov 29, 2020 7:06 pm

I always make sure that the number of regions of electron density match up with the number of hybridized orbitals. Sometimes I try to read the hybridized orbitals as s1p1, s1p2, s1p3... etc rather than just sp or sp2. This makes it clearer when I add it up so that I don't miss that s counts as one of the orbitals.

Joshua Swift
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Re: Sapling #12

Postby Joshua Swift » Sun Nov 29, 2020 7:36 pm

Remember that double and triple bonds don't matter in hybridization, only regions (so any type of bond counts as 1) and lone pairs are counted. Oxygen has two bonds and two lone pairs which gives it an sp3 hybridization.

Keshav Patel 14B 2B
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Re: Sapling #12

Postby Keshav Patel 14B 2B » Sun Nov 29, 2020 8:45 pm

When you're trying to find the hybridization orbitals just look for the amount of electron dense areas. C and O in that problem have 4 areas so you get sp3 because sp3 has 4 areas of electron density, S P P P being the 4 different orbitals that can have electrons.

Gustavo_Chavez_1K
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Re: Sapling #12

Postby Gustavo_Chavez_1K » Sun Nov 29, 2020 10:01 pm

When trying to find hybridization you should look at the number of electron dense areas (so bonds and lone pairs). In this problem carbon has 4 single bonds meaning it has 4 electron dense areas and oxygen has 2 single bonds and 2 lone pairs meaning that it also has 4 electron dense areas. This means that they have a hybridization of sp3.

Jose Miguel Conste 3H
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Re: Sapling #12

Postby Jose Miguel Conste 3H » Sun Nov 29, 2020 10:11 pm

Because there is a total of 4 bonds for C, and 2 bonds with O and 2 lone pairs on O, the hybridization is found out to be SP3

AlbertGu_2C
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Re: Sapling #12

Postby AlbertGu_2C » Sun Nov 29, 2020 10:58 pm

to find the hybridization for the oxygen, you have to count the bonded ATOMS (not just bonds!) and the lone pairs as well, so it would come out to 2 atoms and 2 lone pairs, which is an sp3 orbital

Danielle DIS2L
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Re: Sapling #12

Postby Danielle DIS2L » Sun Nov 29, 2020 11:06 pm

I used this video to help me determine the hybridization! hope it helps :)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4xl0BD-tMeA

Sean Phen
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Re: Sapling #12

Postby Sean Phen » Sun Nov 29, 2020 11:11 pm

I was confused on this question too, but you have to determine the number of electron density regions. Once you know that, you can count the hybridization out. It has four electron density regions, so the hybridization would be sp3.

Andy Hernandez
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Re: Sapling #12

Postby Andy Hernandez » Sun Nov 29, 2020 11:13 pm

When trying to find the hybridization orbitals look for the regions of e- density. C and O in that problem have 4 areas, u get sp3, S P P P being the 4 different orbitals that can have electrons.

Jonathan Banh 1G
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Re: Sapling #12

Postby Jonathan Banh 1G » Sun Nov 29, 2020 11:38 pm

For this problem, we can observe from the Lewis structure that both carbon and oxygen have 4 areas of electron density, with carbon being bonded to 4 atoms while oxygen is bonded to 2 atoms and has 2 additional lone pairs. Hence, since they both have 4 regions of electron density, we can deduce that the hybridized orbital for both of them must be .


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