sapling #11


Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

LexyDenaburg_3A
Posts: 98
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:05 pm

sapling #11

Postby LexyDenaburg_3A » Sat Nov 28, 2020 4:43 pm

Can someone explain how to find hybridization? I'm pretty confused on this question

Elena Chen 2E
Posts: 89
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:09 pm

Re: sapling #11

Postby Elena Chen 2E » Sat Nov 28, 2020 4:57 pm

Hybridization depends on the number of regions of electron density of the atom. So for example, an atom with 4 regions of electron density would have an sp3 hybridization because it has 1 s-orbital and 3 p-orbitals.

Karina Grover 1A
Posts: 91
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:34 pm
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: sapling #11

Postby Karina Grover 1A » Sat Nov 28, 2020 5:03 pm

Hybridization relies on electron arrangement. The number of electron densities around an atom equals the number of hybrid orbitals. If an atom has 4 regions of electron density, then it will have sp3 hybridization (s, p, p, p). If an atom has 2 regions of electron density, then it will have sp hybridization (s, p).

Julianna Shimabukuro 1D
Posts: 95
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:33 pm
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: sapling #11

Postby Julianna Shimabukuro 1D » Sat Nov 28, 2020 5:10 pm

Another way to look at it is to see how many atoms the element is bonded to and the lone pairs on that atom. If it is bonded to three atoms and has a lone pair, for example N in NH3, then this is considered to have 4 electron densities, so its hybridization is sp3. S only has one orbital, and p has up to 3 orbitals. After sp3, if it had more electron densities, you would continue to the d hybridization.

Brendan Duong 1I
Posts: 69
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:07 pm

Re: sapling #11

Postby Brendan Duong 1I » Sat Nov 28, 2020 5:18 pm

To identify hybridization look at how many areas of electron density the atom has:
2 areas: sp
3 areas: sp2
4 areas: sp3
5 areas: sp3d
6 areas: sp3d2

Ven Chavez 2K
Posts: 91
Joined: Mon Feb 24, 2020 12:16 am

Re: sapling #11

Postby Ven Chavez 2K » Sat Nov 28, 2020 5:41 pm

Hybridization depends on the number of regions of electron density meaning bonds and lone pairs. For example, PCl3 has one lone pair and three bonds. This would be sp3 because there are 4 regions of electron density. PO4 has 4 bounds and no lone pairs. This would also be sp3 because there are 4 regions of electron density. It is important to remember Double bonds and Triple bonds are counted as one region of electron density respectively.

Nhu Pham-Dis3G
Posts: 50
Joined: Wed Feb 26, 2020 12:15 am

Re: sapling #11

Postby Nhu Pham-Dis3G » Sat Nov 28, 2020 6:36 pm

To determine hybridization you just need to count up the total number of regions of electron density and then use this guideline:
-2 bonded atoms and lone pairs = sp
-3 bonded atoms and lone pairs = sp^2
-4 bonded atoms and lone pairs = sp^3
-5 bonded atoms and lone pairs = sp^3d
-6 bonded atoms and lone pairs = sp^3d^2

Reese_Gover2K
Posts: 50
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:39 pm

Re: sapling #11

Postby Reese_Gover2K » Sun Nov 29, 2020 12:03 pm

So finding hybridization is just finding the # of regions of electron density. For example, if a Carbon is bound to 3 Hydrogens and has a lone pair, it has 4 regions of electron density which corresponds to an sp3 orbital.
Here's a list of the number of regions and what hybridization they correspond to:
sp-2 regions
sp2-3 regions
sp3-4 regions
sp3d-5 regions
And so on
Hope this helps you :)

Jaden Joodi 3J
Posts: 93
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:31 pm

Re: sapling #11

Postby Jaden Joodi 3J » Sun Nov 29, 2020 12:09 pm

The general guideline for hybridization is as follows:
Regions of e- density = number of hybrid orbitals
1 s-orbital + 1 p-orbital → 2 sp hybridized orbitals (Linear)
1 s-orbital + 2 p-orbitals → 3 sp2 hybridized orbitals (Trigonal planar)
1 s-orbital + 3 p-orbitals → 4 sp3 hybridized orbitals (Tetrahedral)
1 s-orbital + 3 p-orbitals + 1 d-orbital → 5 sp3d hybridized orbitals (Trigonal bipyramidal)
1 s-orbital + 3 p-orbitals + 2 d-orbital → 6 sp3d2 hybridized orbitals (Octahedral)

reyvalui_3g
Posts: 85
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:52 pm

Re: sapling #11

Postby reyvalui_3g » Sun Nov 29, 2020 1:51 pm

Hybridization can be found by counting the number of lone pairs and atoms bonded to the central molecule.

Sophia Kalanski 1A
Posts: 102
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:01 pm
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: sapling #11

Postby Sophia Kalanski 1A » Sun Nov 29, 2020 2:20 pm

It depends on the amount of electron regions there are attached to one atom. If there are 2 then it is an sp orbital since 1s is its own region and one p is another region. Double bonds count as one region.

rhettfarmer-3H
Posts: 101
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:59 pm

Re: sapling #11

Postby rhettfarmer-3H » Sun Nov 29, 2020 4:37 pm

the most prevalent hybridization is the regions of electron density which stems from lone pairs and bonding regions. If you ask for hints it gives you a really good chart that explains which hybridization matches with which orbitals.
2 region---> sp
3 region---> sp^2
4 region---> sp^3
5 region---> sp^3d
6 region---> sp^3d^2


Return to “Hybridization”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests