How to simply determine hybridization


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IreneSeo3F
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How to simply determine hybridization

Postby IreneSeo3F » Sun Nov 29, 2020 11:20 pm

Hi, I am still confused on understanding the concept of hybridization. Does anyone know how to simply determine the hybridization of an atom?

Eliana Witham 2H
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Re: How to simply determine hybridization

Postby Eliana Witham 2H » Sun Nov 29, 2020 11:22 pm

All you have to do is count the number of atoms bonded to that atom, and add this number to the number of lone pairs. sp corresponds to 2, sp2 to 3, and so on.

SophiaBarden 2E
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Re: How to simply determine hybridization

Postby SophiaBarden 2E » Sun Nov 29, 2020 11:26 pm

Here is a helpful little way to remember, but I believe it is also realllyyyy important to understand why the hybridization occurs rather then memorize the numbers.
Image
The attachments ^ means the number of bonding pairs and number of lone pairs (areas of electron density, so a double bond only counts as one)

Zach Richardson 2f
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Re: How to simply determine hybridization

Postby Zach Richardson 2f » Sun Nov 29, 2020 11:27 pm

Hi, first determine the lewis structure of the molecule you want to look at, then look at the number of regions of electron density (bonding pairs + lone pairs) attached to the atom in question. That will tell you how many orbitals you need.

Andy Hernandez
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Re: How to simply determine hybridization

Postby Andy Hernandez » Sun Nov 29, 2020 11:28 pm

You calculate the regions of e- density to get the number of hybrid orbitals

IreneGi2I
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Re: How to simply determine hybridization

Postby IreneGi2I » Sun Nov 29, 2020 11:28 pm

First, calculate the sum of bonding pairs and lone pairs (of the atom in question). The calculated sum is equal to the total orbitals of hybridization orbitals.

For example, sp hybrid orbitals have 1+1=2 orbitals total
sp2 hybrid orbitals have 1+2=3 orbitals total
sp3d hybrid orbitals have 1+3+1=5 orbitals total.

In this way, you can simply estimate what the hybridization would be.
For instance, when you have a bromine atom with 5 bonding pairs and 1 lone pairs, you have sum of 6. Then, the hybridization orbital will be sp3d2 for this bromine atom. Hope this helps!

Victoria_Sauceda_1B
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Re: How to simply determine hybridization

Postby Victoria_Sauceda_1B » Sun Nov 29, 2020 11:31 pm

All you do is count the atoms connected and the number of pairs and then add the two together. If you get:
4=sp^3
3=sp^2
2=sp
(If it’s 1 it’s most likely a hydrogen)

Sydney Jensen 3L
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Re: How to simply determine hybridization

Postby Sydney Jensen 3L » Sun Nov 29, 2020 11:38 pm

The hybridization is determined on how many bonds or lone pairs are surrounding it, and are indicated by letters, such as s,p, or d. For example, if there are three bonds, the hybridization would be sp^3

Mari Williams 1K
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Re: How to simply determine hybridization

Postby Mari Williams 1K » Mon Nov 30, 2020 10:40 am

I just count the connected atoms, and then count my way up the orbitals with that number. 4=sp3, since sp3 is 4 orbitals

Jacob Schwarz-Discussion 3I
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Re: How to simply determine hybridization

Postby Jacob Schwarz-Discussion 3I » Mon Nov 30, 2020 10:49 am

You first need to calculate how many regions of electron density you have. From there if you have 4 regions, it will be sp3, 5 regions, sp3d, and so on

Madison Wong 3H
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Re: How to simply determine hybridization

Postby Madison Wong 3H » Mon Nov 30, 2020 7:11 pm

I just count the regions of electron density and find the corresponding number. sp would be two areas, sp2 would be three areas, sp3 would be four areas, etc .

Juliet Carr 1F
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Re: How to simply determine hybridization

Postby Juliet Carr 1F » Mon Nov 30, 2020 9:28 pm

Like others have said, you should first count the regions of electron density around the central atom in question. Single bonds, double bonds, and triple bonds count as one region of electron density. Lone pairs also count as one region of electron density. Then, that number corresponds to the hybridization. I like to think of the electron density regions in connection to the amount of orbitals in each sub shell. For example, s has 1, p can hold between 1 and 3, etc. So for 2 regions of electron density, the hybridization is sp (1 from s and 1 from p). Then for 3 regions of electron density, the hybridization is sp2 (1 from s and 2 from p). When you get to 5 regions of electron density, you begin to incorporate the d orbital because p can only hold 3 orbitals, (so 1 from s, 3 from p, and 1 from d for a total of 5).

Sejal Parsi 3K
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Re: How to simply determine hybridization

Postby Sejal Parsi 3K » Tue Dec 01, 2020 2:33 am

To determine hybridization, you count the number of atoms that are bonded to the atom and add this number to the number of lone pairs there are around the atom. sp goes with 2, sp2 goes with 3, etc.

Kimiya Aframian IB
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Re: How to simply determine hybridization

Postby Kimiya Aframian IB » Tue Dec 01, 2020 9:43 am

IreneSeo3F wrote:Hi, I am still confused on understanding the concept of hybridization. Does anyone know how to simply determine the hybridization of an atom?

Hi! To determine the hybridization, you want to make sure the total number of s,p,d,and/or f orbitals add up to the total number of bonds. For example, if there are 2 bonds, the hybridization is going to be sp (s is one bond and p is another bond). IF there are 6 bonds, the hybridization is going to be sp^3d^2 (s is one bond, p is three bonds, and d is two bonds). Just remember that you start from s, then fill up p, then d, and lastly f. Hope this helps!

Jordan Tatang 3L
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Re: How to simply determine hybridization

Postby Jordan Tatang 3L » Tue Dec 01, 2020 11:04 am

One trick you could use would just be to count the number of bonds and think about the hybridization that allows for the same number of bonds. i.e. sp^2 has 3 bonds and sp^3 has 4 bonds.

Ravdeep Warar 2G
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Re: How to simply determine hybridization

Postby Ravdeep Warar 2G » Tue Dec 01, 2020 2:19 pm

Personally, I just count the connected atoms, and then count towards the orbitals with the same number. For example, 3 orbitals would be sp2. Another helpful method is that the number of orbitals should correspond with the superscripts added up. So, again, with sp2, p has a superscript of 2 and s has a superscript of 1. When adding them up they total 3, which is also the number of orbitals.

Nhu Pham-Dis3G
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Re: How to simply determine hybridization

Postby Nhu Pham-Dis3G » Tue Dec 01, 2020 2:26 pm

I would just start with counting the number of bonds and determining the number of electron density regions.

Jeremy Wei 2C
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Re: How to simply determine hybridization

Postby Jeremy Wei 2C » Tue Dec 01, 2020 9:26 pm

Hi, so you can determine hybridization by counting the regions of electron density (so counting number of atoms bonded and lone pairs), and from there you can correspond to it to the hybridization like counting 2 would correspond to sp, 3 to sp^2, and so on.

MichaelMendozaD1F
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Re: How to simply determine hybridization

Postby MichaelMendozaD1F » Fri Dec 04, 2020 3:57 pm

SophiaBarden 3H wrote:Here is a helpful little way to remember, but I believe it is also realllyyyy important to understand why the hybridization occurs rather then memorize the numbers.
Image
The attachments ^ means the number of bonding pairs and number of lone pairs (areas of electron density, so a double bond only counts as one)

thank u for this chart! it was very helpful!

105618850
Posts: 59
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:38 pm

Re: How to simply determine hybridization

Postby 105618850 » Sat Dec 05, 2020 8:43 pm

It's actually pretty simple once you understand that all you have to do is determine the number of regions of electron density around the atom. After that it will be pretty simple, 1=s, 2=sp, 3=sp2, etc.

gabbi_r2C
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Re: How to simply determine hybridization

Postby gabbi_r2C » Sat Dec 05, 2020 8:45 pm

The most basic way to determine hybridization is to look at the number of atoms bounded to the atom in question. 1 atom is just s, 2 is sp, 3 is sp^2, 4 is sp^3, etc. Hope this helps!

Binyu You
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Re: How to simply determine hybridization

Postby Binyu You » Sun Dec 06, 2020 2:29 am

Hybridization is based on the number of bonds and lone pairs around. It is indicated in s, p, or d. An example would be 1=s, 2=sp, 3=sp2; 4=sp3. The angles can also be determined according to given information.

Adam Bustamante 1I
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Re: How to simply determine hybridization

Postby Adam Bustamante 1I » Sun Dec 06, 2020 10:48 am

For hybridization, just count the amount of regions of electron density. 1 region would be s, 2 regions would be sp, etc. There are really helpful charts you can look up and study if you're still unsure, but other than that, it's pretty straightforward :)

Chenning Yang Dis3l
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Re: How to simply determine hybridization

Postby Chenning Yang Dis3l » Sun Dec 06, 2020 11:18 am

Count the number of bonds and think about the hybridization that allows for the same number of bonds will help determine!

abby hyman
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Re: How to simply determine hybridization

Postby abby hyman » Sun Dec 06, 2020 11:41 am

I think of hybridization in terms of the electron configuration where the hybridization orbitals are the combination of the orbitals with electrons in them

Taha 2D
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Re: How to simply determine hybridization

Postby Taha 2D » Sun Dec 06, 2020 11:47 am

number of electron density= number of hybrid orbitals
3 densities=sp2
4 densities= sp3
5 densities = sp3d
6= sp3d2

David Y
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Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:49 pm

Re: How to simply determine hybridization

Postby David Y » Sun Dec 06, 2020 4:21 pm

Find the amount of regions of electron density. if it is 2, then hybridization is sp, if 3 then sp2, if 4 regions of electron density, then sp3 and so on

Tatyana Bonnet 2H
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Re: How to simply determine hybridization

Postby Tatyana Bonnet 2H » Sun Dec 06, 2020 4:26 pm

Hybridization is essentially the orbitals that represent the electron density regions. If there are 2 regions then the hybridization of the center atom will be sp, since there are two regions, 2 orbitals are accounted for. Just add up the s, p, and d until you get the number of regions. 3 regions is sp2, 4 is sp3, 5 is sp3d and so on.


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