Ch. 17 Problem 29a  [ENDORSED]

Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

Maria1E
Posts: 61
Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:01 am

Ch. 17 Problem 29a

Postby Maria1E » Wed Nov 15, 2017 8:38 pm

In 29a, why is the answer hexacyanoferrate (II) ion instead of hexacyanidoferrate (II) ion? I thought that since cyanide had an -ide ending it would be converted to -ido.

Thank you!

Chem_Mod
Posts: 18676
Joined: Thu Aug 04, 2011 1:53 pm
Has upvoted: 611 times

Re: Ch. 17 Problem 29a  [ENDORSED]

Postby Chem_Mod » Thu Nov 16, 2017 8:10 am

The older naming convention would use "cyano" and the newest IUPAC naming rules use "cyanido." In this case the text has opted to provide a solution in the old naming convention. You should be familiar with both and both will be acceptable on any exams.

Kayla Ikemiya 1E
Posts: 56
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am

Re: Ch. 17 Problem 29a

Postby Kayla Ikemiya 1E » Sun Nov 19, 2017 5:10 pm

Why do you change iron to ferrate?

Jonathan Tangonan 1E
Posts: 50
Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2017 3:01 am

Re: Ch. 17 Problem 29a

Postby Jonathan Tangonan 1E » Sun Nov 19, 2017 7:03 pm

It changes to ferrate because the "ate" indicates that the overall charge of the complex is negative. Fe originally comes from the latin ferrum and that's where the ate is added onto.

Sophia Kim 1C
Posts: 51
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Ch. 17 Problem 29a

Postby Sophia Kim 1C » Mon Nov 20, 2017 12:35 pm

the suffix -ate indicates that the compound has a negative charge and ferr is from iron so ferrate shows that the iron compound is negative


Return to “Naming”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests