Question 17.29a

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Catherine Yang 3G
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Question 17.29a

Postby Catherine Yang 3G » Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:50 pm

Why is [Fe(CN)6]4- the hexacyanidoferrate(II) ion? Where does the ferrate come from? In what situations does the name of the transition metal change?

Minie 1G
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Re: Question 17.29a

Postby Minie 1G » Wed Nov 22, 2017 1:55 pm

Ferrous means iron. Ever notice that the symbol for iron is Fe instead of like... Ir (actually iridium)? It's derived from latin. Another example is Copper, which you might expect to be Co (that's actually cobalt) but Copper is actually Cu... stands for cupric, also latin for copper.
Tin is another one. Its symbol is Sn (from stannic). If it was Ti, it would be confused with titanium....
Anyways, ferrous is the same as Iron(II), ferric is Iron(III) and same for Cu and Sn.

Swetha Sundaram 1E
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Re: Question 17.29a

Postby Swetha Sundaram 1E » Wed Nov 22, 2017 2:23 pm

The name of the transition metal never really changes, it's just that when naming the molecules you use their latin names rather than the ones that appear on the periodic table.

AtreyiMitra2L
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Re: Question 17.29a

Postby AtreyiMitra2L » Thu Nov 23, 2017 6:09 pm

Naming metal ions are based on the latin names. In the periodic table, iron is denote as Fe. Thats why we write it as ferrate. But don't stress out too much about these. I asked lavelle and they won't really be covered on the test.


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