9c.1 7th Edition

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Tessa Lawler 1A
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Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

9c.1 7th Edition

Postby Tessa Lawler 1A » Mon Dec 03, 2018 9:07 pm

Hello! On part c0 of this question (pg 731), the answer is aquapentacyanocobaltate(III) ion. Is it written "cobaltate" and not simply "cobalt" because of the negative charge of the compound? If so, I assume that's why a) is also hexacyanoferrate(II) ion. How would you name that compound if the overall charge were positive? How would "ferrate" change in this case?

aisteles1G
Posts: 117
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:15 am

Re: 9c.1 7th Edition

Postby aisteles1G » Mon Dec 03, 2018 9:14 pm

Yes, the -ate ending is indicating the negative charge and the ferrum comes from the Latin stem. In the book it states that if the metal originates form a latin name, then the latin stem will be used for negative charges only though!! If the overall charge was positive you would not use the latin stem or ending -ate so not ferrate, you would just say iron.
So to sum up, negative overall charges add an -ate ending as well as the latin stem if there is a latin stem to the element, NO latin stems for overall positive charges, just the regular element name.

Tessa Lawler 1A
Posts: 57
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: 9c.1 7th Edition

Postby Tessa Lawler 1A » Mon Dec 03, 2018 9:23 pm

Great! Thank you!

Ryan Danis 1J
Posts: 66
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: 9c.1 7th Edition

Postby Ryan Danis 1J » Tue Dec 04, 2018 2:44 pm

I was just about to ask why in parts b and d, the cobalt was simply stated as cobalt and not cobaltate in part c. Now I know that’s it’s because we only use the ate ending if the ion is negative. Thanks!


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