oxidation number

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Caitlin_Murphy_3C
Posts: 36
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am

oxidation number

Postby Caitlin_Murphy_3C » Thu Dec 06, 2018 7:00 pm

When finding the oxidation number of a transition metal in a coordination compound, the book says you need you subtract the charge of each ligand present from the overall charge. How do we know which ligands have what charge, or if they have a charge at all? Thanks!

Lumbini Chandrasekera 1B
Posts: 63
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: oxidation number

Postby Lumbini Chandrasekera 1B » Thu Dec 06, 2018 7:04 pm

I believe you just have to become acquainted with the charges of the ligands and familiarize yourself with them.

Kelly Zhang 1L
Posts: 31
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: oxidation number

Postby Kelly Zhang 1L » Thu Dec 06, 2018 7:07 pm

How do you find oxidation numbers of compounds? Should we just know oxidation numbers for all the elements in the periodic table?

Sarah Jeong 4F
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

Re: oxidation number

Postby Sarah Jeong 4F » Thu Dec 06, 2018 7:09 pm

You could figure out the charge of the ligands using the periodic table. For example nitrogen would have a -5 charge when it's considered as an ion, while Carbon has a +4 charge. So the ligand CN would have a total -1 charge. For common compounds such as H20, NH3, and CN-, it is better to memorize them, but you could still figure out the charge using the same method.

Madeera_Mian_3B
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:24 am

Re: oxidation number

Postby Madeera_Mian_3B » Thu Dec 06, 2018 7:21 pm

A formula used in the textbook is (# metal atoms)(oxidation number of the metal)+(# of each ligand)(charge of each ligand)=charge of the ion, let x be the oxidation number to be determined.


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