Bis, Tris, Tetrakis, etc.

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joanneyseung22
Posts: 31
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:15 am

Bis, Tris, Tetrakis, etc.

Postby joanneyseung22 » Sat Dec 08, 2018 12:12 am

There is a rule for naming that states that you used the Greek prefixes bis-, tris-, tetrakis-, etc. if the ligand already contains a Greek prefix. What does this mean, and is there an example that can be used so that I could better understand this concept?

timothy_ho_4B
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:29 am

Re: Bis, Tris, Tetrakis, etc.

Postby timothy_ho_4B » Sat Dec 08, 2018 12:17 am

Bis-, Tris-, and Tetrakis- are typically used for larger ligand to show that there is 2/3/4 of the entire ligand and not just one part of it. A good example would be using these prefixes with ethlyenediamine which is a large ligand.

Zenita Leang 2K
Posts: 67
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Re: Bis, Tris, Tetrakis, etc.

Postby Zenita Leang 2K » Sat Dec 08, 2018 12:18 am

You use bis-tris-tetrakis for polydentate complexes. This is in comparison to bi- tri- and tetra- which is used for monodentate.

Carlos Gomez 3H
Posts: 29
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:25 am

Re: Bis, Tris, Tetrakis, etc.

Postby Carlos Gomez 3H » Sat Dec 08, 2018 12:23 am

Using the Greek prefixes bis-, tris-, tetrakis-, etc. if the ligand already contains a Greek prefix simply means that if the ligand already contains the prefixes di-, tri-, tetra- or hexa- in its name then you should use the other set of prefixes (bis-, tris-, tetrakis-, etc.) to distinguish the coordination number for that type of ligand. A common example is the neutral ligand Ethylenediamine (aka en), NH2CH2CH2NHCH2CH2NH2. If this ligand has a coordination number of 2, then the suffix bis- would be added to the name because the suffix di- is already included in the name as "diamine".


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