polydentate complexes?

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Erica Li 1C
Posts: 31
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:17 am

polydentate complexes?

Postby Erica Li 1C » Sat Dec 08, 2018 11:36 am

I'm super confused on how to figure out if a polydentate is monodentate, bidentate, etc. based on Lewis structure?

Chloe Thorpe 1J
Posts: 77
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:16 am

Re: polydentate complexes?

Postby Chloe Thorpe 1J » Sat Dec 08, 2018 2:44 pm

In a review session, one of the TAs said you look at how many places the ligand can coordinate, and look at if the orientation allows for coordination.

For example, NH3 is monodentate because there is a lone pair on the N which allows for coordination. H2O is also monodentate, even though it has two lone pairs on the oxygen, because the lone pairs could not simultaneously bond with the transition metal due to the geometry of the molecule.

en is bidentate because it has two lone pairs (one on each N), and the orientation has the N atoms positioned in such a way that they could simultaneously coordinate. (see pic of Lewis structure on http://wiki.chemprime.chemeddl.org/arti ... _900b.html )

edta is hexadentate because it can use two of the N and four of the O to bond with the transition metal. (see the second picture on the righthand side of https://openwetware.org/wiki/EDTA )

Nell Mitchell 1E
Posts: 31
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:16 am

Re: polydentate complexes?

Postby Nell Mitchell 1E » Sat Dec 08, 2018 7:08 pm

Polydentate ligands are those that can bind to one central atom in multiple places. The ligand must both be able to form the multiple coordinate covalent bonds, but also be configured in such a way that multiple can form simultaneously.


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