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9C.1 part c

Posted: Mon Jul 22, 2019 10:10 pm
by Jeril Joseph 1B
So, the ion in question is [Co(CN)5(OH2)]2-. I know how to get the oxidation number, but I don't get why in this case you add an -ate to the end of cobalt when naming the ion. Is it because of the water?

Re: 9C.1 part c

Posted: Mon Jul 22, 2019 10:28 pm
by Jeril Joseph 1B
Oh!!! I figured it out. If the coordinate complex has a negative net charge, you add the -ate. That makes sense now.

Re: 9C.1 part c

Posted: Tue Jul 23, 2019 10:18 am
by Leah farhadi 1F
There is also a rule that if iron is the central metal and it’s an anion, then you would use Ferrate.

Re: 9C.1 part c

Posted: Tue Jul 23, 2019 1:34 pm
by Chem_Mod
If the complex ion is an anion, the name of the metal ends with the suffix -ate. For example, Co in a complex anion is called cobaltate and Pt is called platinate. For some metals, Latin names are used in the complex anions. For example, Fe is called ferrate (not ironate).

Re: 9C.1 part c

Posted: Wed Jul 31, 2019 9:21 am
by Bella Martin
does the same rule apply if the compound within the brackets is negative, but the outer metal is positive enough to balance it out? would you still use -ate?