Cobalt vs. Cobaltate

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Katie Bart 1I
Posts: 104
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:16 am

Cobalt vs. Cobaltate

Postby Katie Bart 1I » Sun Nov 24, 2019 5:12 pm

How do you know whether the name of a compound has, for example, cobalt versus cobaltate at the end of it?

Sydney Jacobs 1C
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Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:15 am
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Re: Cobalt vs. Cobaltate

Postby Sydney Jacobs 1C » Sun Nov 24, 2019 5:15 pm

The suffix -ate is added to the stem of the metal's name if the complex has an overall negative charge (an anionic complex). For example, the complex [Ni(CN)4] has a 2- charge, so the name of the ion would be hexacyanidoferrate (II) ion. Hope that helps!

KSong_1J
Posts: 101
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Cobalt vs. Cobaltate

Postby KSong_1J » Sun Nov 24, 2019 5:59 pm

-ate is used if the complex is an anion (is overall negatively charged), so that's when colbatlate would be used. If the complex has an overall positive charge, you would use cobalt.

Helen Struble 2F
Posts: 97
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:17 am

Re: Cobalt vs. Cobaltate

Postby Helen Struble 2F » Sun Nov 24, 2019 9:13 pm

Colbatate indicates that the entire compound has a negative charge. This means the coordination compound is an anion and can form an ionic bond with a cation to form another compound.

kristi le 2F
Posts: 102
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Cobalt vs. Cobaltate

Postby kristi le 2F » Sun Nov 24, 2019 11:08 pm

Additionally, sometimes the -ate is added to the stem of the metal's name not the metal name as it appears on the periodic table. For example, iron is denoted ferrate.


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