ferrate

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Katherine Wu 1H
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Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:15 am
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ferrate

Postby Katherine Wu 1H » Mon Nov 25, 2019 5:45 pm

Writing the formula of this compound: sodium bisoxalato (diaqua) ferrate (III)
What does ferrate refer to?

Anna Heckler 2C
Posts: 102
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:18 am

Re: ferrate

Postby Anna Heckler 2C » Mon Nov 25, 2019 5:46 pm

Ferrate is the anion with chemical formula [FeO4]2−

Cooper Baddley 1F
Posts: 100
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:19 am

Re: ferrate

Postby Cooper Baddley 1F » Mon Nov 25, 2019 5:47 pm

Ferrum refers to the latin name for iron and then the compound has an overall negative charge so you add ate to make it ferrate

Mariepahos4D
Posts: 50
Joined: Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:19 am

Re: ferrate

Postby Mariepahos4D » Mon Nov 25, 2019 7:17 pm

Ferrate is [FeO4]2-. it is a polyatomic anion

Ryan Chang 1C
Posts: 105
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2019 12:17 am

Re: ferrate

Postby Ryan Chang 1C » Mon Nov 25, 2019 8:27 pm

Cooper Baddley 3H wrote:Ferrum refers to the latin name for iron and then the compound has an overall negative charge so you add ate to make it ferrate


Cooper is right in this context. Although ferrate is known as the polyatomic ion [FeO4]2-, in this context, ferrate refers to the metal in the coordination compound molecule. Lavelle told us that when writing the names of negatively charged molecules, we take the latin name for the metal, then replace the last letters with the suffix -ate. In this case, the latin name for iron is ferrum, and when writing the compound, ferrum is turned into ferrate after the suffix -ate is added.


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