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"Ferrate"

Posted: Wed Dec 04, 2019 7:16 pm
by Isabel Day 1D
When naming the complex ion (Fe(CN)6)4-, why is iron represented as "ferrate"? Is this just something I have to memorize?

Re: "Ferrate"

Posted: Wed Dec 04, 2019 7:21 pm
by Brian Tangsombatvisit 1C
when the transition metal is part of a complex ion that is negatively charged, you would name it using its latin prefix and adding -ate at the end instead of just using its regular name. I would say you should probably know a few of the common latin names besides iron like copper (which is cuprate) and tin (which is stannate)

Re: "Ferrate"

Posted: Wed Dec 04, 2019 8:38 pm
by Milisuryani Santoso 1L
Are there any more important common ones besides the ones already listed?

Re: "Ferrate"

Posted: Wed Dec 04, 2019 8:46 pm
by Sanjana Borle 2K
I think the one other exception we would need to know is for copper; it has a latin prefix of "cupr"

Re: "Ferrate"

Posted: Wed Dec 04, 2019 9:12 pm
by Laura WM 3I
Does that mean it's incorrect to name a compound using iron(III) instead of ferrate?

Re: "Ferrate"

Posted: Sun Dec 08, 2019 10:44 pm
by Merin Padayatty 3G
When the coordination compund has an overall negative charge, you would use ferrate instead of iron as the metals in a negative coordination complex end in
-ate.

Re: "Ferrate"

Posted: Sun Dec 08, 2019 11:01 pm
by Eesha Chattopadhyay 2K
According to the textbook, if an element's name on the periodic table is based on their latin name, then that latin name is used in naming the coordination complex. This is also why copper is represented by "cuprate".

Re: "Ferrate"

Posted: Sun Dec 08, 2019 11:22 pm
by Miriam Villarreal 1J
If the complex (inside brackets) is an anion the prefix -ate must be added at the end of the transition metal and iron is part of the exception that uses the beginning of its elemental symbol Fe(rrate)

Re: "Ferrate"

Posted: Sun Dec 08, 2019 11:23 pm
by san_2F
Ferrate is used when the overall complex has a negative charge and there is Iron in the complex. the same concept works for copper and cupperate.

Re: "Ferrate"

Posted: Sun Dec 08, 2019 11:25 pm
by Deepika Reddy 1A
When the complex ion is an anion, then you have to add -ate to the end of the transition metal name. Some of the metals have exceptions, and have ate added a different way which just has to be memorized.

Re: "Ferrate"

Posted: Sun Dec 08, 2019 11:42 pm
by SVajragiri_1C
When the complex is an anion, you use the latin prefix (only if there is one) for the metal, and end it in -ate.

Re: "Ferrate"

Posted: Mon Dec 09, 2019 12:52 am
by 005206171
Ferrate follows the rule of naming anions with adding -ate at the end, but use the latin name for Iron just cause it sounds better.

Re: "Ferrate"

Posted: Mon Dec 09, 2019 1:09 am
by Maddie
why is it that sometimes in coordination compounds it is just iron and other times it is written as ferrate

Re: "Ferrate"

Posted: Mon Dec 09, 2019 3:30 am
by Jennifer Yang 3F
Yes, it is latin prefix, and you just have to memorize the exceptions I believe.

Re: "Ferrate"

Posted: Mon Dec 09, 2019 3:33 am
by ABombino_2J
In this case it would be ferrate because the coordination compound has a negative charge.