-ate, -ide, -ite, -o

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Debora Fernandez Clemente_ 4H
Posts: 52
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:21 am

-ate, -ide, -ite, -o

Postby Debora Fernandez Clemente_ 4H » Sat Dec 07, 2019 7:03 pm

When naming coordination compounds when do use the first three suffix (-ate, -ide, -ite) and when do you use -o?
I would appreciate if there was example provided!

Ryan 1K
Posts: 101
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:15 am

Re: -ate, -ide, -ite, -o

Postby Ryan 1K » Sat Dec 07, 2019 7:09 pm

The -ate suffix is used for the central metal cation is part a coordination compound that has an overall negative charge (K4[Fe(CN)6] is potassium hexacyanoferrate(II)). The -ide suffix is used for an anion that bonds to the coordination compound (anion that comes after the brackets). The -ite suffix is used for anions containing oxygen that has one less O than normal (SO3 2- is sulfite, NO2 - is nitrite). The -o suffix is used for anionic ligands (chloro, fluoro, iodo).

Prasanna Padmanabham 4I
Posts: 111
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:17 am

Re: -ate, -ide, -ite, -o

Postby Prasanna Padmanabham 4I » Sat Dec 07, 2019 7:13 pm

According to the textbook, for any anion inside the [ ] (so any anion directly bonded to the central metal cation), the ending should be an -ato or an -ido or an -ito. For example, the Chloride anion is written as chlorido.

Ryan 1K
Posts: 101
Joined: Fri Aug 09, 2019 12:15 am

Re: -ate, -ide, -ite, -o

Postby Ryan 1K » Sat Dec 07, 2019 7:20 pm

Prasanna Padmanabham 4C wrote:According to the textbook, for any anion inside the [ ] (so any anion directly bonded to the central metal cation), the ending should be an -ato or an -ido or an -ito. For example, the Chloride anion is written as chlorido.



The -ido is part of a newer change, but both the -ido and the -o suffixes are accepted and mean the same thing.


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