naming sphere of influence

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Brett Lieuallen 2A
Posts: 50
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:39 pm

naming sphere of influence

Postby Brett Lieuallen 2A » Fri Dec 04, 2020 3:41 pm

In the case of [Co(NH3)5Cl]ClH2O, why is the second Cl not part of the sphere of influence?

Thomas Vu 1A
Posts: 106
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:08 pm
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Re: naming sphere of influence

Postby Thomas Vu 1A » Fri Dec 04, 2020 4:17 pm

Well I think in this example, the central metal of Co is already full with 6 ligands already, forming an octehdral shape. So it seems like there wouldn't be any room for the second Cl to fit inside the coordination sphere

Jiwon_Chae_3L
Posts: 88
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:39 pm

Re: naming sphere of influence

Postby Jiwon_Chae_3L » Fri Dec 04, 2020 4:24 pm

As Thomas already said, I think that the cobalt already has a full sphere of influence with six bonded ligands.

Madison Muggeo 3H
Posts: 90
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:35 pm

Re: naming sphere of influence

Postby Madison Muggeo 3H » Sat Dec 05, 2020 5:34 pm

Hi! In this example, the second Cl is not directly bonded to the metal which leaves it outside of the immediate sphere of influence for the metal atom.

Keon Amirazodi 3H
Posts: 90
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2020 9:59 pm

Re: naming sphere of influence

Postby Keon Amirazodi 3H » Sat Dec 05, 2020 6:16 pm

The cobalt already has a full sphere of influence meaning the second Cl can't attach to it.

Shruti Kulkarni 2I
Posts: 95
Joined: Thu Oct 08, 2020 12:16 am

Re: naming sphere of influence

Postby Shruti Kulkarni 2I » Sat Dec 05, 2020 7:07 pm

Hi! In this example, the second Cl is not directly bonded to the TM cation but instead bonded to the coordination compound that is formed. This would cause it to be outside the sphere of influence for the cation, and so its name wouldn't be changed in regards to being in the sphere of influence.


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