Naming Coordination Compounds?

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Antonio Melgoza 2K
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Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Naming Coordination Compounds?

Postby Antonio Melgoza 2K » Sat Nov 14, 2015 9:01 pm

For [CoBr(NH3)5] SO4, when written out, why is it bromido and not bromide? Also, why is it cobalt(III) and not cobalt(II)? How would I figure this number out?

904611851
Posts: 20
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Naming Coordination Compounds?

Postby 904611851 » Sat Nov 14, 2015 10:27 pm

For most anionic ligands, we can get the name by taking the element (in this case bromine), removing the end of the word, and attaching "-ido" (bromido).

In order to find the oxidation number of cobalt, we have to figure out the oxidation number of the rest of the compound:
- NH3 has no charge
- Br has a charge of -1
- SO4 has a charge of -2
This adds up to -3, so cobalt would need to have an oxidation number of +3 in order to make the oxidation number of the entire compound equalled to 0.

104607508
Posts: 23
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Naming Coordination Compounds?

Postby 104607508 » Sun Nov 15, 2015 7:18 pm

When naming something like [Co(NH3)4(NO2)Cl]Cl the transition metal is simply written as Cobalt but when naming something like K3[CoF6] the cobalt is written as cobaltate, why is that, both of the coordination complexes have cobalt in them is it due to the fact that in K3[CoF6] the coordination sphere is acting as an anion while in [Co(NH3)4(NO2)Cl]Cl the coordination sphere is acting as the cation to balance out the charge of the chlorine?


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