Iron vs ferrate & oh2

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Robert Valencia 3K
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Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Iron vs ferrate & oh2

Postby Robert Valencia 3K » Sat Nov 14, 2015 9:59 pm

While doing the homework, I noticed some coordination compounds ending with ferrate instead of iron; this also happened with cobalt and cobaltate. How do I know which one to use? I also noticed that the solutions have aqua sometimes written as OH2. When would I use that instead of H2O?

Umair Khan 2G
Posts: 32
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Iron vs ferrate & oh2

Postby Umair Khan 2G » Sat Nov 14, 2015 11:29 pm

When writing the the name of the compound, aqua is always used for H2O, however water is written as OH2 to show that the oxygen bonds to the transition metal, and not the hydrogen atom.

In addition the suffix -ate is added when the coordination compound has a negative charge, as in it is an anion. For example [Co(CN)6]+ has a total charge of positive 1, and thus be called hexacyano cobalt(VII), however if the compound was [Co(CN)6]- it would have a total charge of negative 1 and be called hexacyano coblatate (V).

Cindy Ma 1B
Posts: 7
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Iron vs ferrate & oh2

Postby Cindy Ma 1B » Sun Nov 15, 2015 9:42 pm

For iron, when it has a positive charge, it would be written as Iron (II) as in [Fe(CN)6]^4- or hexacyanoiron(II).

However when it has a negative charge, it would be written as Ferrate (III) as in sodium bisoxalato(diaqua)ferrate(III).

Daniella Ching 4C
Posts: 20
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Iron vs ferrate & oh2

Postby Daniella Ching 4C » Sun Nov 15, 2015 10:00 pm

So if we were given the name for a coordination compound that has aqua in it, would we be expected to know whether to write (OH2) or (H2O)? For example, for triammineaquaplatinum(IV) chloride, can we just write out the chemical formula as: [Pt(NH3)H2O]Cl4


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