How do you find the number of attachment possible?

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Zsanielle Moncayo 1E
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How do you find the number of attachment possible?

Postby Zsanielle Moncayo 1E » Mon Nov 14, 2016 7:03 pm

In the second practice quiz for quiz 3 how is it found that (en) has two possible attachments? Is this based of the lone pairs? If so how does oxalato have 2 possible attachments of it has 10 lone pairs? Thank you!

Monica Habashy 3A
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Re: How do you find the number of attachment possible?

Postby Monica Habashy 3A » Mon Nov 14, 2016 9:15 pm

ethylenediammine it's a bidentate because it has 2 nitrogens. Each nitrogen is bound to only 2 hydrogens which means they have a lone pair of electrons that can bond to the transition metal.

Jasmine Cha 1A
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Re: How do you find the number of attachment possible?

Postby Jasmine Cha 1A » Mon Nov 14, 2016 10:06 pm

Does this mean that whenever en is used you count it as 2 coordination numbers? Also, is dien also 2?

Melanie_Wong_1K
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Re: How do you find the number of attachment possible?

Postby Melanie_Wong_1K » Mon Nov 14, 2016 10:36 pm

Ethylenediamine (en) is a bidentate which means it has 2 attachment sites.
Diethylenetriamine (dien) is a tridentate which means it has 3 attachment sites.

In the table on page 117 of the course reader, I believe every other ligand is a monodentate which means it has one attachment site except except for those with asterisks which are noted as *POLYDENTATE (CHELATE) at the bottom.


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