Polydentates

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Joe Rich 1D
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Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2017 11:39 am
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Polydentates

Postby Joe Rich 1D » Mon Jul 24, 2017 9:10 pm

If a ligand has an atom with 2 pairs of lone electrons (like H2O), why is it not able to donate both pairs of electrons to the central atom? Is it possible for a double or triple bond to be formed in a complex between a central atom and an atom in the ligand?

Kyle Sheu 1C
Posts: 87
Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2017 11:39 am

Re: Polydentates

Postby Kyle Sheu 1C » Mon Jul 24, 2017 9:45 pm

H2O has a bent molecular geometry, so when one lone pair is bonded to the central atom, the other lone pair points about 109 degrees away and is unable to form a bond.

derek1d
Posts: 19
Joined: Wed Jun 28, 2017 3:00 am

Re: Polydentates

Postby derek1d » Mon Jul 24, 2017 10:12 pm

When ligands are bonded to a metal or transition metal, they are bound by sharing electrons. Since it only takes 2 electrons to form a bond that can be shared between the complex and the ligand, double and triple bonds are not required as far as I know. Not completely sure though, hope this helped!

Joe Rich 1D
Posts: 32
Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2017 11:39 am
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: Polydentates

Postby Joe Rich 1D » Mon Jul 24, 2017 10:35 pm

Thank you guys!


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