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Polydentate

Posted: Thu Jun 07, 2018 8:27 pm
by kellyz_1C
How can you tell when a molecule is polydentate vs monodentate? ie; why isn't cyanide polydentate

Re: Polydentate

Posted: Thu Jun 07, 2018 8:35 pm
by Jessica Urzua-1H
A polydentate is able to bind to a metal at several different locations (elements/lone pairs) while a monodentate can only bind to a metal one element/lone pair at time. Cyanide is not a polydentate, because the metal can only bind to one of the lone pairs in the structure at a time, therefore making it a monodentate.

Re: Polydentate

Posted: Fri Jun 08, 2018 3:38 pm
by Fiona Grant 1I
How exactly would you be able to identify where it can form a bond, in order to determine if it is polydentate? For example, how do you know that the molecule N(CH2CH2NH2)2 is tetradentate.

Re: Polydentate

Posted: Fri Jun 08, 2018 3:39 pm
by Natalie Noble 1G
An easy way to do this is to draw the structure and see if there are lone pairs, because that means it can bind to a metal at that site.
In N(CH2CH2NH2)3 all the N have one lone pair, and there are 4 N present, so it is tetradentate

Re: Polydentate

Posted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 1:05 pm
by princessturner1G
There have to be two different atoms which have lone pairs for it to be polydentate, correct?

Re: Polydentate

Posted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 1:08 pm
by AnnaYan_1l
Yes, I believe that multiple atoms in the compound would have to have lone pairs for it to be polydentate. It wouldn't be polydentate if a single N had 3 lone pairs, for example. Instead, it would be polydentate if multiple N had lone pairs.