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Lone Pairs Affecting Bond Angles/Shape?

Posted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 1:35 pm
by Florence-1F
Part of the topics say: "Explain why lone pairs are more likely to found in certain locations around a central atom and how and why they affect the bond angles in a molecule, cation, or anion." Can someone please explain this specific topic please? Also, what is it called when something has more than one lone pair?

Re: Lone Pairs Affecting Bond Angles/Shape?

Posted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 3:43 pm
by alexagreco1A
Lone pairs affect bond angles by decreasing them due to increase repulsion. Because of this, any molecule with lone pairs will have bond angles that are slightly less than predicted.

Re: Lone Pairs Affecting Bond Angles/Shape?

Posted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 3:45 pm
by Tarek Abushamma
Lone pairs reduce bonding angles because they take up more space, resulting from their higher electron-electron repulsion, but I'm not exactly sure what you mean by something that has more than one pair having a specific name.

Re: Lone Pairs Affecting Bond Angles/Shape?

Posted: Thu Jun 14, 2018 4:12 pm
by Chem_Mod
Yes, this is why lone pairs occupy the equatorial positions when there are five regions of electron density (seesaw shape, t-shape, linear shape)

Re: Lone Pairs Affecting Bond Angles/Shape?

Posted: Tue Nov 27, 2018 6:24 pm
by Ashley P 4I
Lone pairs decrease bong angles. Got it. Thank you!!