Polydentates

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Isabel Nakoud 4D
Posts: 101
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

Polydentates

Postby Isabel Nakoud 4D » Wed Nov 28, 2018 7:36 pm

*Referring to question 17.33 (b) *

If the CO32- structure has 3 oxygen atoms, all equipped with at least one lone pair of electrons, then why can the ion only serve as a mono- or bidentate and not a tridentate ligand?

Andonios Karas 4H
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

Re: Polydentates

Postby Andonios Karas 4H » Wed Nov 28, 2018 7:47 pm

This question was posed previously on Chem Community.

Answer: The oxygen atoms is on the opposite side. If you visualize it, there is no way for it to be bound to all of the oxygen atoms at one. It can barely bind to 2 at once. Hence, it can be mono or bidentate.

Image

https://lavelle.chem.ucla.edu/forum/viewtopic.php?t=23830

Isabel Nakoud 4D
Posts: 101
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

Re: Polydentates

Postby Isabel Nakoud 4D » Wed Nov 28, 2018 7:53 pm

Additionally, for oxalate, why is it only a bidentate and not a tetra dentate?

In addition to one oxygen from each side being bonded, can't the oxygen adjacent to it also be bonded, as demonstrated by Dr. Lavelle's example in class (the chemotherapy example with Cl) ?

Chloe Qiao 4C
Posts: 65
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

Re: Polydentates

Postby Chloe Qiao 4C » Fri Nov 30, 2018 9:45 am

Oxalate is a bidentate because the arrangement of its atoms only allows two oxygen to bind to a given metal at a given time.


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