How to tell whether a compound is polydentate

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Leela_Mohan3L
Posts: 44
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:26 am

How to tell whether a compound is polydentate

Postby Leela_Mohan3L » Sun Dec 02, 2018 2:10 pm

I know that it has to do with the amount of ligands with lone pairs, but does the shape of the ligand matter as well when determining whether it is bidentate or tridentate?

Cody Do 2F
Posts: 62
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am

Re: How to tell whether a compound is polydentate

Postby Cody Do 2F » Sun Dec 02, 2018 2:18 pm

The shape of the ligand (or rather, where each atom is placed) does affect whether a molecule is mono/bi/tridentate! For example, if you had a ring-shaped ligand that had a binding site on one end and another binding site on the complete opposite end, then the molecule is monodentate (This is because if one of the binding sites is connected to the metal atom, the other binding site is sticking off the opposite end and can't be bonded to the metal atom). If there are three binding sites and two of them are next to each other while the third one is on the opposite side, then the ligand is bidentate as the two that are close to each other are capable of forming bonds, but the third is just sticking out.

Leela_Mohan3L
Posts: 44
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:26 am

Re: How to tell whether a compound is polydentate

Postby Leela_Mohan3L » Sun Dec 02, 2018 2:54 pm

Cody Do 3B wrote:The shape of the ligand (or rather, where each atom is placed) does affect whether a molecule is mono/bi/tridentate! For example, if you had a ring-shaped ligand that had a binding site on one end and another binding site on the complete opposite end, then the molecule is monodentate (This is because if one of the binding sites is connected to the metal atom, the other binding site is sticking off the opposite end and can't be bonded to the metal atom). If there are three binding sites and two of them are next to each other while the third one is on the opposite side, then the ligand is bidentate as the two that are close to each other are capable of forming bonds, but the third is just sticking out.


That's what I thought with regards to shape, thank you! But for some ligands it is difficult to tell the shape, so how do you determine whether its mono/bi/tridentate in this case?


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