How to tell which ligands can be polydentrate

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John_Richey_4A
Posts: 69
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:27 am

How to tell which ligands can be polydentrate

Postby John_Richey_4A » Fri Dec 07, 2018 5:18 pm

How can you tell which ligands can be polydentrate, and by how much?

Andre_Galenchik_2L
Posts: 69
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:23 am

Re: How to tell which ligands can be polydentrate

Postby Andre_Galenchik_2L » Fri Dec 07, 2018 7:03 pm

For the 7th edition, it is on page 724.

305127455
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:16 am

Re: How to tell which ligands can be polydentrate

Postby 305127455 » Fri Dec 07, 2018 9:39 pm

The angle between two ligands need to be around 90˚.

Claire Stoecklein 1E
Posts: 49
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:15 am

Re: How to tell which ligands can be polydentrate

Postby Claire Stoecklein 1E » Wed Dec 04, 2019 4:10 pm

Can a ligand be polydentate if it has two lone pairs on the same atom? Such as an oxygen atom?

Esha Chawla 3L
Posts: 53
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:17 am

Re: How to tell which ligands can be polydentrate

Postby Esha Chawla 3L » Wed Dec 04, 2019 4:51 pm

Claire Stoecklein 1E wrote:Can a ligand be polydentate if it has two lone pairs on the same atom? Such as an oxygen atom?


Even if the ligand has two lone pairs, I don't think the ligand can be polydentate. One such example is 9C.5 (c). Water, for example, has 2 lone pairs - however, due to its geometry, only one of the lone pairs could actually form a bond with a ligand. Thus, it would be monodentate despite having two lone pairs.


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