Page 1 of 1

Polydentate

Posted: Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:34 pm
by salvadorramos3k
How can you tell when a molecule is polydentate?

Re: Polydentate

Posted: Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:38 pm
by Nohemi Garcia 1L
A ligand is a polydentate when there are multiple molecules to that one ligand (like NH2CH2CH2NH which is a bidentate).

Re: Polydentate

Posted: Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:39 pm
by KarineKim2L
A ligand can bind at each lone pair. However, molecular shape must also be taken into account to see if the lone pairs are in a location that can be binded to another molecule. For example, Cl- has 4 lone pairs, but it cannot be a polydentate. It can only be a monodentate because its bond angles are 109.5 degrees, and therefore the other lone pairs cannot wrap around to bind.

Re: Polydentate

Posted: Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:39 pm
by Andrew Pfeiffer 2E
The molecule in question is a polydentate when

a.) the ligand has at least 2 molecules that have lone pairs and

b.) the atoms have a geometry that enables the transition metal cation to be bound in more than one place at the same time.

Re: Polydentate

Posted: Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:43 pm
by lilymayek_1E
polydentate ligands are ligands that bind to a central metal atom with more than one atom (more than 1 binding site, or more than 1 e- pair donated). EDTA is an example of this - a hexa(6)dentate ligand with six donor atoms, all with e- pairs that can bind to a central metal atom or ion.

Re: Polydentate

Posted: Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:48 pm
by Janet Nguy 2C
Andrew Pfeiffer 1J wrote:The molecule in question is a polydentate when

a.) the ligand has at least 2 molecules that have lone pairs and

b.) the atoms have a geometry that enables the transition metal cation to be bound in more than one place at the same time.


what kind of geometries would allow for this?