Polydentate Potential

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ahuang
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Polydentate Potential

Postby ahuang » Wed Dec 04, 2019 7:24 pm

How do you know if a ligand can be polydentate? I know that the metal can bond to the lone pairs but for example in Oxalate (C2O4 2-), it can be bidentate, but why is it not tetradentate?

Andrew Liang 1I
Posts: 105
Joined: Fri Aug 30, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Polydentate Potential

Postby Andrew Liang 1I » Wed Dec 04, 2019 7:59 pm

Oxalate (C2O4 2-) can only be a bidentate because when you draw the lewis structure there are only 2 lone pairs in the molecule (one on each farthest oxygen atom). In order to be a tridentate, the ligand must have at least 3 lone pairs.

PriscillaLi_3G
Posts: 63
Joined: Fri Sep 27, 2019 12:30 am

Re: Polydentate Potential

Postby PriscillaLi_3G » Wed Dec 04, 2019 8:22 pm

ahuang wrote:How do you know if a ligand can be polydentate? I know that the metal can bond to the lone pairs but for example in Oxalate (C2O4 2-), it can be bidentate, but why is it not tetradentate?


If you draw the lewis structure and do the formal charges, you will notice that there are only 2 atoms in which there is a formal charge of -1. Thus these are the only two possible bonding sites, which makes it a bidentate.


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