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Oxolate Chelate

Posted: Thu Dec 05, 2019 12:17 am
by Jasmine 2C
Is oxolate (C204)2- considered bidenate because two of the oxygens at the ends have single sigma bonds (so they can rotate and bind to more sites) while the other two oxygens have pi bonds (so they can't rotate and donate their electron pairs)?

Re: Oxolate Chelate

Posted: Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:57 am
by Myka G 1l
Oxalate is bidentate because only two of the oxygens have a minus 1 charge that they use to form a bond with the central metal atom. The other two oxygens form a double bond with the carbon so they have a neutral formal charge.

Re: Oxolate Chelate

Posted: Thu Dec 05, 2019 11:57 am
by Angela Patel 2J
are chelates only bidentate?

Re: Oxolate Chelate

Posted: Thu Dec 05, 2019 12:05 pm
by KnarGeghamyan1B
Chelates are polydentates so 2 or more bonding sites.

Re: Oxolate Chelate

Posted: Thu Dec 05, 2019 12:58 pm
by Nuoya Jiang
No, chelates can form at least BIdentate.

Re: Oxolate Chelate

Posted: Thu Dec 05, 2019 9:35 pm
by Claire Stoecklein 1E
Are polydentates with three bonding sites called tridentate? Or do we only specify bidentate?

Re: Oxolate Chelate

Posted: Fri Dec 06, 2019 3:25 pm
by Jasmine 2C
Myka G 3J wrote:Oxalate is bidentate because only two of the oxygens have a minus 1 charge that they use to form a bond with the central metal atom. The other two oxygens form a double bond with the carbon so they have a neutral formal charge.

Does it matter if they have a negative bond or not? For molecules like ethylenediamine, the nitrogens that allow it to be bidentate have a neutral formal charge.