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Ligand polydentate

Posted: Sat Dec 07, 2019 3:56 pm
by Hannah_1G
How do you figure out how many sites a ligand can bind to on a metal?

Re: Ligand polydentate

Posted: Sat Dec 07, 2019 4:04 pm
by Nohemi Garcia 1L
I'm not entirely sure, but I think it depends on the lone pairs within a molecule. Like water is a monodentate because it can only bond through oxygen which has 2 sets of lone pairs. With en (ethylenediamine) since it has multiple nitrogens with lone pairs, it is able to bond through multiple site, making it a polydentate.

Re: Ligand polydentate

Posted: Sat Dec 07, 2019 4:42 pm
by Joowon Seo 3A
It depends on how many lone pairs the ligand has. For example, en has two nitrogen with lone pairs and is a bidentate.

Re: Ligand polydentate

Posted: Sat Dec 07, 2019 9:49 pm
by Alan Cornejo 1a
Nohemi Garcia 1I wrote:I'm not entirely sure, but I think it depends on the lone pairs within a molecule. Like water is a monodentate because it can only bond through oxygen which has 2 sets of lone pairs. With en (ethylenediamine) since it has multiple nitrogens with lone pairs, it is able to bond through multiple site, making it a polydentate.


So only one of the lone pairs on oxygen is used ?

Re: Ligand polydentate

Posted: Sat Dec 07, 2019 10:49 pm
by Adelpha Chan 1B
Alan Cornejo 1a wrote:
Nohemi Garcia 1I wrote:I'm not entirely sure, but I think it depends on the lone pairs within a molecule. Like water is a monodentate because it can only bond through oxygen which has 2 sets of lone pairs. With en (ethylenediamine) since it has multiple nitrogens with lone pairs, it is able to bond through multiple site, making it a polydentate.


So only one of the lone pairs on oxygen is used ?


Yes, only one oxygen is used. This is shown in the naming compound sheet linked in another post indicating the water molecule is OHO with the bond to the first oxygen