formation of coordination compounds

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Lucy Wang 2J
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formation of coordination compounds

Postby Lucy Wang 2J » Sun Nov 29, 2020 11:14 am

In lecture #24, Professor Lavelle mentioned that to form salts, KCN or NaCl or NH3 would replace water's position in the ligand. Is there a reason water is so easily replaceable in a ligand solution?

Yu Jin Kwon 3L
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Re: formation of coordination compounds

Postby Yu Jin Kwon 3L » Sun Nov 29, 2020 1:15 pm

That's a really good question! I feel like it has to do with H2O being really polar, which means that it can easily be broken if there are other ions around (and since salts are made up of cations and anions, water can easily be replaced in that sense). I'm not too sure if this is the most accurate answer, but this is my take on it :)

Sandra Kim 2B
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Re: formation of coordination compounds

Postby Sandra Kim 2B » Sun Nov 29, 2020 1:20 pm

i think this might be how ion-dipole interactions are stronger than dipole-dipole interactions. (but i am also not too sure; there could be more to it)

Joseph Hsing 2C
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Re: formation of coordination compounds

Postby Joseph Hsing 2C » Sun Nov 29, 2020 1:25 pm

It probably has to do with the relative stability of the different ligands and their bonding. I'm assuming water is less stable than some of the compounds you listed when bonded with a metal ion.


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