Ligands and Poly vs Mono dentates

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704578485
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Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Ligands and Poly vs Mono dentates

Postby 704578485 » Mon Nov 09, 2015 9:24 pm

I was just looking through some of the homework problems for the coordination compound chapter and several of them involve recognizing whether a ligand is a polydentate or not. For instance a question make is is carbonate a polydentate or monodentate. How exactly do you know whether a ligand has the ability to form multiple bonds with the central transition metal? Also, in a question like that would a bidentate qualify as a polydentate?

Rachel Lin 2D
Posts: 20
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 3:00 am

Re: Ligands and Poly vs Mono dentates

Postby Rachel Lin 2D » Mon Nov 09, 2015 10:41 pm

A ligand has the ability to form multiple bonds with a transition metal if it has multiple elements with lone pairs, and if the angle of the two elements is small enough to bond to the same transition metal. For example, oxalate has two oxygens bonded to each of the two carbons. So oxalate has four possible spots to bond with a transition metal, as oxygen has lone pairs. However, it's most likely that only two oxygens can bond to the same transition metal, since the carbons place their bonded oxygens on opposite ends of each other.

And yes, a polydentate is any ligand that bonds to a transition metal at least twice.


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