Hydrogen Bonding sites

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AprilPaz
Posts: 51
Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:18 am

Hydrogen Bonding sites

Postby AprilPaz » Tue Dec 03, 2019 3:49 pm

How can you tell how many hydrogen bonding sites there are?

Jordan Young 2J
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Re: Hydrogen Bonding sites

Postby Jordan Young 2J » Tue Dec 03, 2019 4:24 pm

Each lone pair on an oxygen, nitrogen, or fluorine is a potential hydrogen bonding site and each hydrogen that is attached to an oxygen, nitrogen, or fluorine is a potential hydrogen bonding site. For example, water has 4 hydrogen bonding sites (2 lone pairs on oxygen and 2 hydrogens attached to the oxygen).

alexfwang3g
Posts: 50
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Hydrogen Bonding sites

Postby alexfwang3g » Tue Dec 03, 2019 4:25 pm

Each lone pair on an oxygen, nitrogen, or fluorine is a potential hydrogen bonding site. Also, a hydrogen that is attached to an oxygen, nitrogen, or fluorine is also a potential hydrogen bonding site.

Leila_4G
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Re: Hydrogen Bonding sites

Postby Leila_4G » Tue Dec 03, 2019 8:25 pm

In organic molecules where they don't show the carbon atoms or lone pairs, do we assume that there are lone pairs around Oxygens or hydrogens...?

Kaitlynn Tran 3F
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Joined: Wed Sep 18, 2019 12:20 am

Re: Hydrogen Bonding sites

Postby Kaitlynn Tran 3F » Sat Dec 07, 2019 4:02 pm

Leila_4E wrote:In organic molecules where they don't show the carbon atoms or lone pairs, do we assume that there are lone pairs around Oxygens or hydrogens...?


You would assume that each atom has however many lone pairs it would need for a complete octet

chrischyu4a
Posts: 52
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Hydrogen Bonding sites

Postby chrischyu4a » Sat Dec 07, 2019 4:39 pm

Each hydrogen that is attached to either N, O, or F counts as a potential binding site and every lone pair on a N, O, or F atom

Annika Zhang 1F
Posts: 49
Joined: Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Hydrogen Bonding sites

Postby Annika Zhang 1F » Sat Dec 07, 2019 7:22 pm

as long as one molecule has O,N,or F it is a potential bonding site as long as there is a Hydrogen on the other molecule

Adelpha Chan 1B
Posts: 58
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:15 am

Re: Hydrogen Bonding sites

Postby Adelpha Chan 1B » Sat Dec 07, 2019 10:48 pm

AprilPaz wrote:How can you tell how many hydrogen bonding sites there are?

hydrogen bonding sites occur at lone pairs and at hydrogens that are bonded to O N or F (forming a polar hydrogen bond)

Martina
Posts: 111
Joined: Thu Jul 25, 2019 12:16 am

Re: Hydrogen Bonding sites

Postby Martina » Sun Dec 08, 2019 12:24 am

Any hydrogen attached to a F, O , or N , and any lone pairs on those atoms can make hydrogen bonds.


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