Do we include (aq) in equilibrium equation?

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Lindsey Lill
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Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:57 pm

Do we include (aq) in equilibrium equation?

Postby Lindsey Lill » Sun Nov 13, 2016 8:16 pm

The notes say not to include solids and liquids in K expression. But the example right after uses an Ca^2+(aq). Why do we use it although it's aqueous? Is it not a liquid?

Tycho_Meimban_2B
Posts: 31
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:57 pm

Re: Do we include (aq) in equilibrium equation?

Postby Tycho_Meimban_2B » Sun Nov 13, 2016 8:51 pm

Unlike gases and substances in solution, liquids and solids essentially have a constant concentration. This is because liquids and solids are practically incompressible, as the molecules in liquids and solids are very close together, with very little room to squeeze any closers, taking an enormous amount of pressure to cause even a tiny reduction in volume. Such changes in volume are ignorable.

Logan 3C
Posts: 22
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2016 2:57 pm

Re: Do we include (aq) in equilibrium equation?

Postby Logan 3C » Sun Nov 13, 2016 10:01 pm

Yes you include aqueous. Not technically a liquid.

Samuel_Vydro_1I
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Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2016 3:00 am

Re: Do we include (aq) in equilibrium equation?

Postby Samuel_Vydro_1I » Mon Nov 14, 2016 8:00 pm

The K equation deals with concentrations and as such aqueous solutions consist of dissolved solutes which can change in concentration unlike a solid group of atoms which cannot change in concentration


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