Partial pressure definition

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Yolandia Winn 1A
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Joined: Fri Jun 23, 2017 11:39 am

Partial pressure definition

Postby Yolandia Winn 1A » Mon Jul 31, 2017 2:52 pm

Why is partial pressure called "partial" pressure? Where is the other part? Lol

EDIT: Thanks all great responses I get it now lol!
Last edited by Yolandia Winn 1A on Mon Jul 31, 2017 3:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Chem_Mod
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Re: Partial pressure definition

Postby Chem_Mod » Mon Jul 31, 2017 2:59 pm

The other part of the partial pressure is the other parts of the gas mixture. So for air, we could take the partial pressure of the oxygen or the partial pressure of the nitrogen etc.

Stephanie H
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Re: Partial pressure definition

Postby Stephanie H » Mon Jul 31, 2017 2:59 pm

I found the definition of partial pressure in the textbook, it is "the pressure that a gas in a mixture would exert if it alone occupied the container."
I think "partial" is mentioned because we are considering a combination of gases in a reaction and each gas is a part of the whole (reaction). Hope this helps!

Sarah_Wilen
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Re: Partial pressure definition

Postby Sarah_Wilen » Mon Jul 31, 2017 3:00 pm

Partial pressure is the pressure that would be exerted by one of the gases in a mixture of gases by itself.

For example, our atmosphere is composed of a mixture of gases. To name some there is nitrogen and oxygen gas. I don't know the exact number, but for an example, let's say we trapped atmosphere in a jar. The pressure of the mixture of gases would be 760 mmHg. You are told that the partial pressure of oxygen is 152 mmHg. What is the partial pressure of nitrogen? Well, how do we figure that out? Simple, we subtract the partial pressure of the oxygen from the total pressure of the whole mixture of gases to obtain the partial pressure of nitrogen. 760 mmHg-152 mmHg=608 mmHg. The partial pressure of nitrogen is 608 mmHg in this mixture.


Lol indeed
Good question


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