Finding The Direction of Reaction

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Sarah Spalding 3E
Posts: 10
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:06 am

Finding The Direction of Reaction

Postby Sarah Spalding 3E » Sat Nov 25, 2017 12:06 am

Is there more than one way to find the direction of a reaction? Mathematically or otherwise.

sahiltelang-Discussion 1J
Posts: 50
Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2017 3:00 am

Re: Finding The Direction of Reaction

Postby sahiltelang-Discussion 1J » Sat Nov 25, 2017 10:49 am

You have to mathematically derive Q, the reaction quotient to determine the direction of the reaction. By comparing it to K, one can then use a ICE table to determine the equilibrium concentrations or partial pressures.

YashDeshmukh1D
Posts: 42
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:05 am

Re: Finding The Direction of Reaction

Postby YashDeshmukh1D » Sat Nov 25, 2017 10:51 am

What does favoring one side of the reaction mean? Can a reaction at equilibrium favor a certain side?

tiffanyteguh1C
Posts: 20
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:04 am

Re: Finding The Direction of Reaction

Postby tiffanyteguh1C » Sun Nov 26, 2017 12:29 am

I think the easiest way to finding the direction of a reaction is by using an ICE table.

404995677
Posts: 82
Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 am

Re: Finding The Direction of Reaction

Postby 404995677 » Sun Nov 26, 2017 9:24 am

Does favoring one side mean that there is more of reactant than product (favors left) or more product than reactant(favors right)?

John Huang 1G
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Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2017 3:00 am
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Re: Finding The Direction of Reaction

Postby John Huang 1G » Sun Nov 26, 2017 9:52 am

When it says, "The equilibrium is favored to the right," it means that the rate of the forward reaction will be greater than the rate of the reverse reaction. The vice versa for this scenario applies as well. The phrase is not referring to the concentrations of the reactants or products, but rather the rates.
And a reaction at equilibrium simply means that the rate of forward reaction is equal to the rate of the reverse reaction. The concentrations of reactants and products do not have to be equal for a reaction to be at equilibrium.


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