11.7

Moderators: Chem_Mod, Chem_Admin

Christina Chang 1C
Posts: 34
Joined: Thu May 10, 2018 3:00 am

11.7

Postby Christina Chang 1C » Tue Jan 08, 2019 9:06 pm

I was confused on what the difference was between the third and fourth flask because they both have equal amounts of product and reactant.

Anna O 2C
Posts: 98
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:19 am

Re: 11.7

Postby Anna O 2C » Tue Jan 08, 2019 9:07 pm

Could you explain what problem you are referring to? Writing out the problem would be easiest.

Grace Kim 1J
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am
Been upvoted: 1 time

Re: 11.7

Postby Grace Kim 1J » Tue Jan 08, 2019 9:16 pm

The question asks for when it reaches equilibrium, so it would be the third flask because there is no dissociation in flasks 3 and 4 (they are both 5; no change after the third flask). The diatomics in each flask from left to right is 11, 8, 5, 5. Flask 3 is the time at which the reaction reached equilibrium because it is earlier in time (left of flask 4).

Hope this helped!

Christina Chang 1C
Posts: 34
Joined: Thu May 10, 2018 3:00 am

Re: 11.7

Postby Christina Chang 1C » Tue Jan 08, 2019 9:19 pm

Oh ok! Thank you! Do you also know if for part b it's the ratio of products to reactants?

Ashley Kenney 1E
Posts: 32
Joined: Wed Nov 14, 2018 12:23 am

Re: 11.7

Postby Ashley Kenney 1E » Tue Jan 08, 2019 9:36 pm

For part b, it's asking for the percentage of molecules that have decomposed, so you want to use a ratio of the number of diatomic molecules in flask three minus the number in flask one, to the number of diatomic molecules you began with in flask one. Taking the difference between the number of diatomic molecules in flasks 1 and 3 gives you the number of diatomic molecules that have decomposed.

Hanniel U 2B
Posts: 76
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:16 am

Re: 11.7

Postby Hanniel U 2B » Tue Jan 08, 2019 9:39 pm

If you are asking about the percentage of X2 molecules that has decomposed at equilibrium, It is the difference between the diatomics at the start and when it reaches equilibrium which is 11-5=6. Divide that by the diatomics at the start = (6/11)*100= 54.5%. I'm not sure but that's how I answered it.


Return to “Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest