How to use ICE tables

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Maayan Epstein 14B
Posts: 20
Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2018 11:20 pm

How to use ICE tables

Postby Maayan Epstein 14B » Thu Jan 10, 2019 1:29 pm

How do I know what to plug into ice tables? For example, I know that I can plug in molarity to find initial, change, and equilibrium. Will this work for pressure too?
Thanks!

Chem_Mod
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Re: How to use ICE tables

Postby Chem_Mod » Thu Jan 10, 2019 2:39 pm

Yes. Because, partial pressure in a gas reaction is essentially a way to represent concentration and you can use the ideal gas law to convert.

Kevin ODonnell 2B
Posts: 53
Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2018 11:24 pm

Re: How to use ICE tables

Postby Kevin ODonnell 2B » Thu Jan 10, 2019 5:54 pm

This table may help to visualize it all, and is an example that uses Molarity.
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Eruchi Okpara 2E
Posts: 44
Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2018 11:28 pm

Re: How to use ICE tables

Postby Eruchi Okpara 2E » Sat Jan 12, 2019 4:38 pm

I'm still confused on how to find the change in molarity, can someone explain please? Does the number in front of the X come from the coefficient that is in front of the reactant or product?

Michelle Wang 4I
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Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2018 11:27 pm

Re: How to use ICE tables

Postby Michelle Wang 4I » Sat Jan 12, 2019 4:47 pm

Hi Eruchi,
In this situation we don't know the exact change in molarity that occurs in the reaction. We know that when the Cu(NH3)42+ dissociates, it forms 4 mol of NH3 and 1 mol of Cu2+. We use the stoichiometric coefficients of the balanced chemical equations to write the x that is added or taken away. That is why the 4NH3 has a +4x change in molarity.

tierra parker 1J
Posts: 51
Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2018 11:17 pm

Re: How to use ICE tables

Postby tierra parker 1J » Sat Jan 12, 2019 4:48 pm

Eruchi Okpara 2E wrote:I'm still confused on how to find the change in molarity, can someone explain please? Does the number in front of the X come from the coefficient that is in front of the reactant or product?

yes the coefficient of x is from the coefficients from the balanced equation. if the equilibrium concentration is given then you subtract the initial concentration from the equilibrium concentration


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