Q vs K

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Cecilia Jardon 1I
Posts: 74
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:16 am

Q vs K

Postby Cecilia Jardon 1I » Thu Jan 10, 2019 8:45 pm

Is Q just the calculation of a reaction that has not yet reached equilibrium?

Kate Chow 4H
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:28 am

Re: Q vs K

Postby Kate Chow 4H » Thu Jan 10, 2019 8:54 pm

Q is just a calculation of equilibrium at a certain point within the reaction. Q changes as the reaction shifts towards equilibrium. However, Q = K at equilibrium.

004932366
Posts: 31
Joined: Wed Nov 22, 2017 3:00 am

Re: Q vs K

Postby 004932366 » Thu Jan 10, 2019 10:31 pm

The same method of calculating K is used to calculate Q. Q, the reactant quotient, is different from K when the reaction has not reached equilibrium, and depending on how much larger of smaller Q is from K, one is able to tell whether the forward or backwards reaction is favored. Like what the person before said, Q=K when the reaction is at equilibrium. If Q<K at some point during the reaction (when Q is calculated), the forward reaction is favored. If Q>K at some point in the reaction, the reverse reaction is favored.

405112316
Posts: 62
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:17 am

Re: Q vs K

Postby 405112316 » Thu Jan 10, 2019 11:14 pm

Q and K and calculated the same exact way: concentration of products over concentration of reactants. However, Q calculates the status of a reaction when it is not in equilibrium; the purpose is to understand what direction the reaction is currently moving in.

Lumbini Chandrasekera 1B
Posts: 63
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:18 am

Re: Q vs K

Postby Lumbini Chandrasekera 1B » Thu Jan 10, 2019 11:46 pm

Q CAN be at equilibrium or it can't. It's simply meant to describe the state of the reaction to compare to K value of the reaction at equilibrium to see where that reaction is sitting.

MadisonB
Posts: 63
Joined: Fri Sep 28, 2018 12:19 am

Re: Q vs K

Postby MadisonB » Fri Jan 11, 2019 12:56 am

Simply put, Q is at any moment and K is when in equilibrium. Q can be used to show change.


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